Post a New Question

english

posted by .

the next paragraph :)
And thank you soooo much for helping me!

Now we wanted to answer the research questions. We will have a closer look to the complements and try to find answers why which verb takes which complement.

The verb to smell took mostly Noun Phrases ( [1] 34 times). Nine times we found an Adjective Phrase [2], four times a Prepositional Phrase [3] and one time a wh-clause complement [4], a ing-participle clause [5] and we find it also one time without an complement [6].
We did not found the verb to smell with that- clause complement in the BNC but nevertheless you can use the verb to smell with one [7].

[1] I could smell smoke and hear the most terrible screams.
[2] But the Recycling Rose does not always smell sweet [...]
[3] […] she was afraid her new dress might soon smell of sweat like the old one.
[4] […] so that you can experience in sight, sound and smell exactly what it was like to live and work in
[5] You could smell rubber burning.
[6] Mind you, he doesn't smell -- he must have got somewhere he can go for a bath at least once.
[7] I smell that you are baking a cake.

  • english -

    Now we wanted to answer the research questions. We will have a closer look at the complements and try to find answers as to why which verb takes which complement.

    The verb to smell took mostly Noun Phrases ( [1] 34 times). Nine times we found an Adjective Phrase [2], four times a Prepositional Phrase [3] and one time a wh-clause complement [4], a ing-participle clause [5], and we find it also one time without a complement [6].
    We did not find the verb to smell with that-clause complement in the BNC, but nevertheless you can use the verb to smell with one [7].

    [1] I could smell smoke and hear the most terrible screams.
    [2] But the Recycling Rose does not always smell sweet [...]
    [3] […] she was afraid her new dress might soon smell of sweat like the old one.
    [4] […] so that you can experience in sight, sound, and smell exactly what it was like to live and work in
    [5] You could smell rubber burning.
    [6] Mind you, he doesn't smell; he must have had a bath at least once.
    [7] I smell that you are baking a cake.

    I've made some corrections. Be sure to compare yours and mine VERY carefully to catch them.

    The only error in content I find is that in your 4th example, the word "smell" is used as a noun, not as a verb. I'd remove that example since it has nothing to do with verbs and complements.

  • english -

    Thanks :) and the next

    The verb to look took most frequently a Prepositional Phrase namely 38 times [1], it took ten times an adjective Phrase [2] and it was found one time with a that clause without that complement [3] and also one time without a complement [4]. The word look was often used as a noun in the example sentences of the BNC.

    [1] I look after her madam!
    [2] [...] I think I never saw her look better in my life.
    [3] Very well. Follow that lord, and look you mock him not.
    [4] Oh. I didn't look.

  • english -

    The verb to look most frequently took a Prepositional Phrase, namely 38 times [1]; it took an adjective Phrase ten times [2]; it was found one time with a that clause without that complement [3]; and one time without a complement [4]. The word look was often used as a noun in the example sentences of the BNC.

    [1] I look after her, madam!
    [2] [...] I think I never saw her look better in my life.
    [3] Very well. Follow that lord, and look you mock him not.
    [4] Oh. I didn't look.

    I don't understand what you mean in the section I underlined.

    Again, I made some corrections, so compare yours and mine carefully.

    I also put to look and look in italics ... which I forgot to do in your first post above. Remember that when you refer to a word as a word, not using it in its meaning, it needs to be in italics.

  • english -

    Also ... "prepositional phrase" and "phrase" should not have initial capital letters.

  • english -

    I do have it in italics in my word text programm. But thanks for remeber me.

    With the sentence I mean that I found to look one time with a that clause where the that does not occur. So we call them that without that - clause complement.
    Do you understand it now?

  • english -

    OK, you're referring to a that-clause in which the actual word that is absent (or assumed or understood, even though it doesn't appear in print). That happens a lot in spoken and sometimes in written English, yes.

  • english -

    exactly that is what I meant. So can it stand the way I wrote it?

  • english -

    next paragraph:

    The verb to see took that most different complements. We found 7 different complements, and see was never used as a noun in the example sentences of the BNC.
    The verb to see took 34 times a Noun Phrase like the verb to smell did. To see took two times a prepositional phrase [2]. It was the verb that took the most subordinate clause complements (that clause without that [3] three times, that clause [4] seven times, wh - clause [5] two times, ing - participle clause [6] one time and also one time an if - clause [7].

    [1] I'll see you later.
    [2] We tried to see into it, and wondered what horrible thing would appear
    [3] You see as great as her spirit is, she can't bear that.
    [4] Helen could see that Carl's face was very white and there was blood on his mouth
    [5] I don't see why we have to be so careful?'
    [6] She looked up, to see him smiling at her.
    [7] The list of journals was examined by date of publication, to see if there were any trends in journals [...]

  • english -

    I would change it a little bit:

    it was found one time with a that-clause in which the word that was absent, but understood [3]

  • english -

    ok thank you.

  • english -

    The verb to see took the largest number of different complements. We found 7 different complements, and see was never used as a noun in the example sentences of the BNC.
    The verb to see took a noun phrase 34 times, just as the verb to smell did. To see took a prepositional phrase two times[2]. It was the verb that took the most subordinate clause complements (that clause without that [3] three times, that clause [4] seven times, wh - clause [5] two times, ing - participle clause [6] one time and also one time an if - clause) [7].

    [1] I'll see you later.
    [2] We tried to see into it, and wondered what horrible thing would appear
    [3] You see, as great as her spirit is, she can't bear that.
    [4] Helen could see that Carl's face was very white and there was blood on his mouth
    [5] I don't see why we have to be so careful?
    [6] She looked up, to see him smiling at her.
    [7] The list of journals was examined by date of publication, to see if there were any trends in journals [...]

  • english -

    Conclusion
    In this conclusion we will summarize the similarities and differences of the verbs of perception. Table 2 can give a first overview of the different complements.
    You can see that although the verbs are semantically similar they are different in their complementation.
    To smell and to see shows variation in use, whereas the verb to look has the biggest number in use as a noun.
    We don’t found the verb to see without complementation. That is the case because to see is a transitive verb. That means that it need an Object. To smell can be used transitive and intransitive.
    We don’t find to look with a Noun Phrase. That is the case because to look is a verb that is most used intransitive that means that it can’t take an object and Noun Phrases mostly occurs Objects.
    To smell and to see takes the some numbers of Noun Phrases.
    To look takes 38 times a Prepositional Phrase. To look and to see took them together only 6 times.

  • english -

    The first sentence needs to be revised (or perhaps deleted). It's obvious and redundant.

  • english -

    In conclusion, there are many similarities and differences among the verbs of perception. Table 2 gives a first overview of the different complements.
    You can see that, although the verbs are semantically similar, they are different in their complementation.
    To smell and to see show variation in use, whereas the verb to look has the greatest number in use as a noun.
    We don’t find the verb to see without complementation because to see is a transitive verb: it needs a direct object. To smell can be used as either a transitive or intransitive verb.
    We don’t find to look with a noun phrase because to look is most often used intransitively: it can’t take an object. Since noun phrases mostly occur as objects, we don't find them with to look.
    To smell and to see take the same numbers of noun phrases.
    To look took a prepositional phrase 38 times. To look and to see took them together only 6 times.

  • english -

    and the last part:

    To see is in our search never found with an Adjective Phrase, whereas to smell and to look took nearly the same number of Adjective Phrases (see Table 2).

    We don’t found many subordinate clause complements in our research for the three verbs. To look only took one time a subordinate clause complement, to smell two times and the most subordinate clause complements took the verb to see with 14 times. To see was also the only verb that took a that clause complement and an if clause complement.

  • english -

    In our search, to see is never found with an adjective phrase, whereas to smell and to look took nearly the same number of adjective phrases (see Table 2).

    We don’t find many subordinate clause complements in our research for the three verbs. To look only took a subordinate clause complement one time, to smell two times, and the most subordinate clause complements were taken with the verb to see, 14 times. To see was also the only verb that took a that clause complement and an if-clause complement.

    In English, you never use a past verb form of any kind with these auxiliary verbs:
    do, does, did, don't, doesn't, didn't
    can, could, can't, couldn't
    will, would, won't, wouldn't
    and others: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/auxiliary.htm

    In English, you always use a past participle with any form of to be or to have unless it's formed in combination with any of the auxiliary verbs in the first group above.

    I know that the use of auxiliary verbs in English can be just awful to get under control!

  • delete -

    Thank you so much!!
    And it would be great if you can delete now this tread :)

    Thanks, Thanks, Thanks!!

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

More Related Questions

Post a New Question