Chemistry

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2C6H6(l) + 15O2 (g) ---> 12CO2 (g) + 6H2 (l)

Calculate the deltaHrxn using standard heats of formations from Appendix C, paying close attention to the physical states of substances.

Thanks!

  • Chemistry -

    dHrxn = (n*dHf products) - (n*dHf reactants)

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