Post a New Question

MATH !!

posted by .

n
lim(n→+∞)⁡ ∑ (3/4)^k =
k=1


the n is supposed to be above the sigma sign and the k=1 is supposed to be below the sigma sign. thanks.

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

  1. further mathematics

    The roots of the eqn, x^4 + px^3 + qx^2 + rx + s = 0 where p, q, r, s are constants and s does not equal to 0, are a, b, c, d. (i) a^2 + b^2 + c^2 + d^2 = p^2 -2q (in terms of p & q) (ii) 1/a + 1/b + 1/c + 1/d = -r/s (in terms of r …
  2. Algebra

    find the indicated sum not sure how to type the sigma sign, but here is the problem 6 on top of the sigma sign. under the sigma sign is i=3 and on the right side of the sigma sign (3i-2)
  3. Physics

    If I wanted to right SIGMA F = ma in the proper notation what would I put above and below SIGMA Would I put a lower case "n" above SIGMA and "i = 0" below it and then put a subscript "i" under the "F" thank you I have been woundering …
  4. Physics

    If I wanted to right SIGMA F = ma in the proper notation what would I put above and below SIGMA Would I put a lower case "n" above SIGMA and "i = 0" below it and then put a subscript "i" under the "F" thank you I have been woundering …
  5. Please Help

    n lim(n→+∞)⁡ ∑ (3/4)^k = k=1
  6. maths

    A sequence is defined by un = 2×(−0.5)n + 3 (n = 1,2,3, . . .). Choose the option that best describes the long-term behaviour of the sequence. Options A un becomes arbitrarily small (that is, un → 0 as n→∞). …
  7. maths

    A sequence is defined by un = 2×(−0.5)n + 3 (n = 1,2,3, . . .). Choose the option that best describes the long-term behaviour of the sequence. Options A un becomes arbitrarily small (that is, un → 0 as n→∞). …
  8. Math

    calculate lim┬(√(x^2+y^2)→∞)⁡〖(sin⁡(x^2 y^2))/(2x^2+3y^2 )〗
  9. Algebra II

    Please help-I need to write 4+6+8+10 in sigma notation would it be sigma sign in middle (3) on top of sign, n=0 on bottom of signma notation and to the right it would be (4+2n) so it would look like-- (3) (sigma in middle) (4+2n) n=0
  10. Math (sigma stuff!)

    Hi! Looking to find n∑k=1 8(k/n) (n is supposed to be on top, k=1 below the sigma sign)in closed form. I've tried doing 8*[(n(n+1)/2)/n], and that didn't seem to work. I'm not sure if I'm supposed to do anything with the n or …

More Similar Questions

Post a New Question