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Oh Brother Where Art Thou?

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In the film, Oh Brother Where Art Thou?, it is seen that Ulysses Everett is very self-conscious about the way his hair looks. This display vanity. Is there any different situation in the film in which Ulysses is vain? (his vanity must ultimetly bring forth his downfall)

  • Oh Brother Where Art Thou? -

    Look at the scene where they meet the women washing clothes by the creek. That will give you a clue.

  • Oh Brother Where Art Thou? -

    I recall that scene but wasn't it Pete who wanted Ulysses to stop the car in order to see the Sirens?

  • Oh Brother Where Art Thou? -

    To be quite honest I'm not too sure how that ties in with vanity :S

    Could it be that he often boasts about his intelligence and then he loses his friend Pete because of the Sirens?

  • Oh Brother Where Art Thou? -

    In the scene of the sirens in Joyce's great novel Ulysses (I hope you get the connection here), was it the Sirens who were calling to Ulysses or was it Ulysses self-belief that he was something to be desired? Now, consider that in the scene from the movie.

    Parody is a great artform.

  • Oh Brother Where Art Thou? -

    Is there a quote from the movie which states that Ulysses was desired because I need proof D:

  • Oh Brother Where Art Thou? -

    Ulysses had an extremely high opinion of himself....and all his attributes - warrior, man...etc.

    What other people think is not the problem... his own "ego" is what leads him to do things which get him in trouble. Look at both characters in this frame of reference.

  • Oh Brother Where Art Thou? -

    Thanks :)

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