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Chemistry

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Regarding Flame Tests,
why do you have to subject the sample to a flame? Which part of the Bunsen Burner is hottest? Why is it necessary to hold the loop in this part of the flame? What do you think will happen if you perform the flame test on a solution with more than one metal component? Aside from the qualitative analysis of metals, state at least one other application of flame tests. Will each and every metal emit a different flame test color? WhY?

  • Chemistry -

    1. A flame heats the sample and may produce a flame color that helps us detect the presence of a certain element. Some elements cause the flame to glow a certain color which tells us that element is present in the sample. For example, a very bright yellow-orange flame color tells us sodium is present.
    2. The part of the flame that makes the loop glow is hottest part of the flame. Flame tests require intense heat.
    3. If two metallic elements are present in the sample, the flame color will be a mixture of the two flame colors, or the more intense color may dominate.
    4. The light from a flame test can be analyzed with a spectroscope or a spectrograph for more detailed information about the composition of the sample being tested.
    5. Most metals do not emit a characteristic flame test color when observed by eye. However, if the flame color is viewed through a prism or diffraction grating in a spectroscope, the colors are different and characteristic for each element.

  • Chemistry -

    the yellow bunsen flame produces alot of soot . give a reason for this obsevation

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