math, algebra

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Problem: A formula for a football player's rushing average r with a total of y yards rushed in n carries of the ball is r=y/n. Solve for n.

I have no other information this is how its in the book how do i even solve for n if theres no numbers.

You don't use numbers. It asks to solve for n.
r=y/n
What the problem is asking you to do is to get n on the left side and all the other variables on the other side. That is "solving for n."

Multiply both sides of the equation by n.
r*n=n*(y/n)
You see that cancels the n on the right.
r*n=y
Now how can we get r to the other side. We can divide both sides by r.
(r*n)/r=y*r
That move cancels the r on the left.
n=y/r and there you have it. You have solved for n in terms of the other variables. Now, whan and if you get numbers, you can put in y and r and solve for n in terms of a number.

i wouldn't of ever figuered that out.

You don't use numbers. It asks to solve for n.
r=y/n
What the problem is asking you to do is to get n on the left side and all the other variables on the other side. That is "solving for n."

Multiply both sides of the equation by n.
r*n=n*(y/n)
You see that cancels the n on the right.
r*n=y
Now how can we get r to the other side. We can divide both sides by r.
(r*n)/r=y*r I made an error here. I said to divide both sides by r and I did divide the left side by r but I multiplied on the other side. I should have written (r*n)/r=y/r. The final equation that follows; i.e., n=y/r is correct as I have it below. I guess I thought one think but typed something else. Sorry about that.
That move cancels the r on the left.
n=y/r and there you have it. You have solved for n in terms of the other variables. Now, whan and if you get numbers, you can put in y and r and solve for n in terms of a number.


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