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Naming Chemical Compounds
By: Bryce R
The periodic table is made up of the most simplest and complex elements. These elements chemically combine to form ionic or covalent bonds. When naming them, there is quite a bit of information that you must remember in order to name them correctly. Although it may seem confusing at first, once you get it down it becomes easier than ever. People tend to make many small errors when naming because there is a multitude of rules you must go by. I have gathered all of the information in order to correctly name them, and I made them as simple as I possibly could.
Metals with a fixed charge are as followed; the group one metals are called the alkali metals with a fixed charge of plus one. The second group is called alkaline earth metals with a fixed charge of plus two. The last group of metals with a fixed charge is the Boron family with a fixed charge of plus three. When mixed with a nonmetal they chemically combine to form an ionic compound. Nonmetals with a fixed charge are as followed; the group fifteen nonmetals is the Nitrogen family with a fixed charge of minus three. The second group is called the oxygen family with a fixed charge of minus two. The last group of nonmetals has a fixed charge of minus one. Lastly, the D block and group 14 do not contain a fixed charge. There charges are determined when mixed with a nonmetal. To determine the chemical name of the binary compounds you must look at the charges of the elements.
Type one compounds consist of a metal from group one, two, or thirteen mixed with a nonmetal. To write a binary compound you start with the metal. You locate the metal on the periodic table. You write down the metal with charge above it. Next, you want to locate the nonmetal on the periodic table. You write down the nonmetal next to the metal, with the charge above the nonmetal. You must look at the charges of both the metal and nonmetal. If they are the same, you simply write the elements together. The metal always comes first, followed by the nonmetal. But if the numbers are different you must crisscross the charges. The switched numbers will follow directly after the element. If the numbers share a common number you must simplify to simplest terms.

An example of a type 1 bond would be when you mix the elements sodium and chlorine. They chemically combine to form NaCl.

Type two compounds consists of metals from the D block or group 14 chemically mixed with a nonmetal. In order to write an ionic compound with these metals you need to know the charge, since there is no fixed charge. To write an ionic compound you start with the metal. You write the down the symbol of the metal with the charge above. Then, you must locate the nonmetal and find the fixed charge of the nonmetal. You write the nonmetal down with the charge about it. It is the same process to name them as the type one compounds. Make sure you remember to put the charges in the simplest terms.

An example of a type 2 bond is when you mix Iron with Chlorine. They chemically combine to form FeCl2

When naming binary covalent compounds the fixed charges do not come into play. You must use prefixes based on the given charge of the element which includes mono, di, tri, tetra, penta, hexa, hepta, octa, nona, and deca. These prefixes are listed in order from one to ten. You place the prefix in front of the element name, never adding a space between the prefix and the name. If the given charge of the first element is one, you never put mono in front of the element name.

When writing an binary covalent bond, you must use two nonmetals. To form F3O4 you must have three fluorine and four oxygen atoms. Then, add in the prefixes. Trifluoride TetraOxide

When naming ionic compounds containing polyatomic ions you must first determine if it’s a polyatomic ion. If the element is not listed on the periodic table including a charge, this means you are dealing with a polyatomic ion. Polyatomic ions are never on the periodic table, and are generally listed elsewhere. Find the corresponding polyatomic ion and list it next to the element and its charge. If the ionic compound contains more than one polyatomic ion you can place parentheses around the polyatomic ion formulas.

An example of a type 4 bond is when you mix sodium with carbonate. The chemically combine to form Na2(CO3).

If you still don’t understand, don’t worry! The more you practice, the better you get. With so many different rules to abide by, it’s quite easy to get them mixed up or confused. Try to take each one step by step, and not overthink. Always make sure to look over your final answer, to assure yourself that’s its correct. Now when you see a periodic table, you’ll know how to name different types of chemical compounds and impress people with your chemistry skills.

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  1. I do not have time to go through the whole article, but I will respond to the first paragraph. Comments will be all caps.

    The periodic table is made up of (A RANGE OF ELEMENTS, FROM THE SIMPLEST TO MOST COMPLEX.)the most (DELETE "MOST" IT IS REDUNDANT.) simplest and complex elements. These elements chemically combine to form ionic or covalent bonds. When naming them (THE ELEMENTS ARE ALREADY NAMED, DOES THE "THEM" REFER TO COMPOUNDS OR FAMILIES OF ELEMENTS?) , there is quite a bit of information that you must remember in order to name them correctly. Although it may seem confusing at first, once you get it down it becomes easier than ever. People tend to make many small errors when naming (WHAT?) (COMMA) because there is a multitude of rules you must go by ("FOLLOW" AVOID PREPOSITIONS AT THE END OF A SENTENCE, BECAUSE THEY TYPICALLY REQUIRE AN OBJECT.). I have gathered all of the information in order to correctly name them, and I made them as simple as I possibly could.

    Metals with a fixed charge are as followS (COLON) the group one metals are called the alkali metals with a fixed charge of plus one. The second group is called alkaline earth metals with a fixed charge of plus two. The last group of metals with a fixed charge is the Boron family with a fixed charge of plus three.

    (WHEN CHANGING TOPIC, IDEA, PERSON, PLACE OR TIME, IT IS BETTER TO START A NEW PARAGRAPH.)

    When mixed with a nonmetal they chemically combine to form an ionic compound. Nonmetals with a fixed charge are as followS (COLON) the group fifteen nonmetals is the Nitrogen family with a fixed charge of minus three. The second group is called the oxygen family with a fixed charge of minus two. The last group of nonmetals (WHAT FAMILY?) has a fixed charge of minus one. Lastly, the D block and group 14 do not contain a fixed charge. There (THEIR) charges are determined when mixed with a nonmetal. To determine the chemical name of the binary compounds you must look at the charges of the elements.

    (EITHER INDENT OR SKIP A LINE BETWEEN PARAGRAPHS.)
    Type one compounds consist of a metal from group one, two, or thirteen mixed with a nonmetal. To write a binary compound (COMMA) you start with the metal. You locate the metal on the periodic table. ("YOU" UNNECESSARY OF REPEAT.) Write down the metal with charge above it. Next, (DELETE) locate the nonmetal on the periodic table. Write down the nonmetal next to the metal, with the charge above the nonmetal. (DELETE) Look at the charges of both the metal and nonmetal. If they are the same, you simply write the elements together. The metal always comes first, followed by the nonmetal. But if the numbers are different (COMMA) you must crisscross the charges. The switched numbers will follow directly after the element. If the numbers share a common number (COMMA) you must simplify to simplest terms. (EXAMPLES MIGHT HELP HERE.)

    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/607/02/

    I HOPE THIS HELPS.

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  2. THANK YOU!

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