Physics_Vectors

You can swim at a speed v relative to the water. You are swimming across a river which
flows at a speed V relative to the shore. The river is straight and has a constant width.
A. If you wish to swim directly across the river, in what direction should you swim
relative to the water in the river?
B. If you wish to get across the river as quickly as possible and don’t care where you
land on the opposite bank, in what direction should you swim relative to the
water?

  1. 👍 0
  2. 👎 0
  3. 👁 180
asked by Sky_
  1. Is this for UofT physics lab?? I need help on that too.

    1. 👍 0
    2. 👎 0
    posted by PHY131

Respond to this Question

First Name

Your Response

Similar Questions

  1. Physics

    A swimmer, capable of swimming at a speed of 0.8 m/s in still water (i.e., the swimmer can swim with a speed of 0.8 m/s relative to the water), starts to swim directly across a 2.5 km wide river. However, the current is 0.91 m/s,

    asked by Bill on September 25, 2012
  2. physics

    Question: The swim portion of a triathlon takes place in a river and is an out-and-back course. The river has a steady current that is 0.400m/s and the athletes swim against the current for 750m before turning and swimming with

    asked by Sydney on September 16, 2014
  3. Physics

    A swimmer, capable of swimming at a speed of 1.44 m/s in still water (i.e., the swimmer can swim with a speed of 1.44 m/s relative to the water), starts to swim directly across a 2.21-km-wide river. However, the current is 0.840

    asked by Ashley on September 28, 2014
  4. PHYSICS

    A swimmer, capable of swimming at a speed of 1.24 m/s in still water (i.e., the swimmer can swim with a speed of 1.24 m/s relative to the water), starts to swim directly across a 2.24-km-wide river. However, the current is 0.553

    asked by Physics2hard4me on March 27, 2015
  5. science-physics

    A swimmer, capable of swimming at a speed of 1.97 m/s in still water (i.e., the swimmer can swim with a speed of 1.97 m/s relative to the water), starts to swim directly across a 2.77-km-wide river. However, the current is 1.13

    asked by pd on October 7, 2012
  6. physics

    A swimmer, capable of swimming at a speed of 1.01 m/s in still water (i.e., the swimmer can swim with a speed of 1.01 m/s relative to the water), starts to swim directly across a 1.47-km-wide river. However, the current is 1.01

    asked by louis AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA on February 6, 2013
  7. physics

    A swimmer, capable of swimming at a speed of 1.3 m/s in still water (i.e., the swimmer can swim with a speed of 1.3 m/s relative to the water), starts to swim directly across a 2.2-km-wide river. However, the current is 0.91 m/s,

    asked by manny on September 18, 2012
  8. physics

    A swimmer, capable of swimming at a speed of 1.18 m/s in still water (i.e., the swimmer can swim with a speed of 1.18 m/s relative to the water), starts to swim directly across a 2.16-km-wide river. However, the current is 1.19

    asked by amanda on September 11, 2015
  9. physics

    A swimmer, capable of swimming at a speed of 1.81 m/s in still water (i.e., the swimmer can swim with a speed of 1.81 m/s relative to the water), starts to swim directly across a 2.29-km-wide river. However, the current is 1.31

    asked by anonymous on August 8, 2015
  10. physics

    A duck is swimming across a river. The duck can swim at maximum speed of 2m\s in still water. If the duck i swimming as hard as possible straight across a river that running at 4m\s, what is the duck's overall speed, relative to

    asked by atiyya on November 6, 2016

More Similar Questions