physics

Consider a charge of +2.0 C placed at the origin of an X-Y co-ordinate system and a charge of -4.0 C placed 40.0 cm to the right. Where must a third charge be placed – between the charges, to the left of the origin, or beyond the second charge – to experience a net force of zero? Argue your case qualitatively without working out a solution. Consider both positive and negative charges.

  1. 👍 0
  2. 👎 0
  3. 👁 549
  1. the electric field of q1 E1
    the electric field of q2 E2

    Net electric field is vector sum of
    electric fields due to q1 and q2.

    the point to the left from origin:
    E1←,→ E2 (can give zero)
    the point between q1 and q2 :
    E1 →,→ E2.(can’t give zero)
    the point to the right from q2:
    E1→,← E2. (E2>E1, =>can’t give zero).
    Let's find the location of the point where electric field is zero.
    k•q1•q3/r1² = k•q2•q3/r2²,
    r1 =x,
    r2 = x+d, where d = 0.4 m.
    2/x² = 4/(x+d)²,
    x² - 2•d•x - d² = 0.
    Solve for x.
    x1 = 0.954 m (to the left from origin - both for positive and negative q3)
    x2 = - 0.164 m (is unsuitable)

    1. 👍 0
    2. 👎 0

Respond to this Question

First Name

Your Response

Similar Questions

  1. physics

    A point charge of –3.00 μC is located at the origin; a point charge of 4.00 μC is located on the x axis at x = 0.200 m; a third point charge Q is located on the x axis at x = 0.320 m. The electric force on the 4.00 μC charge

  2. Physics

    A charge q1 = 5 ìC is at the origin. A second charge q2 = -3 ìC is on the x-axis, 0.8 m from the origin. The electric field at a point on the y-axis, 0.5 m from the origin is: I don't understand the question please help . Thanks

  3. Physics

    one charge of +10 uC is placed at the origin, a second charge of +5uC is placed at (2cm, 4cm) and a third charge (-15 uC) is placed at (4cm, 1 cm). What is the magnitude and direction of the electric force exerted on the first

  4. physics

    A point charge with charge q1 is held stationary at the origin. A second point charge with charge moves from the point (x1,0) to the point (x2,y2). How much work is done by the electrostatic force on the moving point charge?

  1. Phyiscs

    Three point charges are arranged along the x-axis. Charge q1 = +2.75 µC is at the origin, and charge q2 = -6.00 µC is at x = 0.220 m. Charge q3 = -7.00 µC. Where is q3 located if the net force on q1 is 6.75 N in the

  2. Physics Please help3

    A point charge with charge q1 = 3.10μC is held stationary at the origin. A second point charge with charge q2 = -4.60μC moves from the point ( 0.160m , 0) to the point ( 0.270m , 0.255m ). How much work W is done by the electric

  3. physics

    A charge of +q is located at the origin, while an identical charge is located on the x axis at x = 0.45 m. A third charge of +4q is located on the x axis at such a place that the net electrostatic force on the charge at the origin

  4. science

    Three point charges are placed on the x-axis. A charge of +2.0 μC is placed at the origin, -2.0 μC to the right at x = 50 cm, and +4.0 μC at the 100 cm mark. What are the magnitude and direction of the electrostatic force which

  1. physics

    Two charges are located on the positive x-axis of a coordinate system. Charge q1 = 2.00 × 10−9C, and it is 0.020 m from the origin. Charge q 2 = –3.00 × 10 −9 C, and it is 0.040 m from the origin. What is the electric

  2. Physics

    a charge q1=5.00nc is placed at the origin of an xy-coordinate system ,and a charge q2=-2.00nc is placed on the positive x-axis at x=4.00cm (a.) if a third charge q3=6.00nc is now placed at the point x=4cm, y=3.00cm. find the x

  3. Physics

    A +5.0 µC charge is placed at the origin and a -3.3 µC charge is placed at x = 25 cm. At what coordinates can a third charge be placed so that it experiences no net force? (x=? m)

  4. Physics

    A point charge Q= 4.60 uC is held fixed at the origin. A second point charge q=1.20 uC with mass of 2.80 * 10^-4 is placed on the x-axis 0.250 m away from the origin.

You can view more similar questions or ask a new question.