Physical Chemistry

In terms of bomb calorimetry, can one assume the temperature of the water surrounding the cmopartment is equal to the temperature within the compartment? If not, how would one determine T for the reaction occuring inside the compartment?

  1. πŸ‘ 0
  2. πŸ‘Ž 0
  3. πŸ‘ 20
asked by xX_Supaman_Xx
  1. At equilibrium the two temperatures are the same; however, in the immediate vicinity, time wise, of pushing the button to react the materials, the T inside is considerably higher than that outside. What methods do you have to measure the temperature of the explosion.

    1. πŸ‘ 0
    2. πŸ‘Ž 0
    posted by drbob222

Respond to this Question

First Name

Your Response

Similar Questions

  1. chemistry

    How to find delta H using calorimetry?? I know the answer but I m having trouble getting there!? 5.5 grams of C2H6 are burned in a bomb calorimeter with the heat of 4.96kJ/degree Celsius and holds 1000g of H20. the change in

    asked by homework on December 18, 2017
  2. chemistry

    An alternative approach to bomb calorimetry is toestablish the heat capacity of the calorimeter, exclusive of the water it contains. The heat absorbed by the water and by the rest of the calorimeter must be calculated separately

    asked by Nancy on October 11, 2014
  3. Chem

    Suppose that the 10.0 g of NH3 is formed in a bomb calorimeter, and that all of the evolved heat for the exothermic reaction is completely absorbed by the surrounding 1000 g of water. Find the change in temperature (Ξ”T), and the

    asked by Feather on October 20, 2014
  4. Chemistry

    How much boiling water would you need in order to raise the bath to body temperature (about 37)? Assume that no heat is transferred to the surrounding environment. Imagine that your water heater has broken, but you want to take a

    asked by Bella on November 4, 2010
  5. Chemistry

    A quantity of 1.435g of naphthalene (C1oHs), a pungent-smelling substance used in moth repellents, was burned in a bomb calorimeter (constant volume). Consequently, the temperature of the water rose from 20.17Β°C to 25.84Β°C. If

    asked by Anonymous on September 30, 2018
  6. Chemistry

    How much boiling water would you need in order to raise the bath to body temperature (about 37)? Assume that no heat is transferred to the surrounding environment. Imagine that your water heater has broken, but you want to take a

    asked by Bella on November 4, 2010
  7. Chemistry

    Imagine that your water heater has broken, but you want to take a bath. You fill your bathtub with 25kg of room-temperature water (about 25C). You figure that you can boil water on the stove and pour it into the bath to raise the

    asked by Anonymous on February 17, 2010
  8. Urgent-Chemistry Help

    I need help with the heat effects and calorimetry worksheet. Please explain how to solve it! Thank you so much! A metal sample weighing 45.2g and at a temperature of 100.0 C was placed in 38.6g of water in a calorimeter at 25.6 C.

    asked by Tiffany on December 4, 2006
  9. AP Chemistry

    The heat of reaction for burning 1 mole of a certain compound X is known to be -477.7 kJ. The calorimeter constant of the bomb being used is 2500 j/degree celsius and the initial temperature of the water is 23.2 degrees celsius.

    asked by Jacob on February 15, 2010
  10. chemistry

    15. How much heat energy (in kJ) is evolved by a reaction in a bomb calorimeter in which the temperature of the bomb and water increased from 19.5 to 22.83 ΒΊC? The bomb has a heat capacity of 650 J/ο‚°C; the calorimeter contains

    asked by nona on March 26, 2015

More Similar Questions