physics

Find the horizontal distance the skier travels before coming to rest if the incline also has a coefficient of kinetic friction equal to 0.23. (The incline makes an angle θ = 20.0° with the horizontal.)

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asked by sarah
  1. Is there more information that goes with this problem? What is her initial speed before skiing up the incline?

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    posted by drwls
  2. A skier starts from rest at the top of a frictionless incline of height 20.0 m, as shown in the figure. As the bottom of the incline, the skier encounters a horizontal surface where the coefficient of kinetic friction between skis and snow is 0.23.
    the skier's speed at the bottom is 19.8 m/s
    and the skier travels on the horizontal surface before coming to a rest for 87.0 m

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    posted by sarah
  3. You seem to have answered your own question already, with the 87.0 meter dstance. I agree with the 19.8 m/s speed at the bottom, which equals
    V = sqrt(2gH).

    After that, work done agaisnt friction euqls kinetic energy at the bottom.

    u*M*g*X = (1/2)M V^2

    X = V^2/(2*u*g) = 87 m

    u is the kinetic friction coefficient

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    posted by drwls
  4. 87m

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    posted by joshua

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