language arts

Which best states how information presented in team moon and the NASA article are different?

A. the NASA article is about the Apollo 11 mission, while the team moon is mostly about "space race">>>

B. the team moon article captures the excitement of the Apollo 11 moon landing, while NASA article does not.

C. The team moon article is about president Kennedy, while NASA is about Neil Armstrong

D. the NASA article covers the entire Apollo 11 flight, while the Team Moon is mostly about landing.

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  1. its for Lesson 6: Synthesizing Information: Part 2
    1001010 M/J LANG ARTS 1 - T1 Unit 3: That's Pretty Clever

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  2. ok, here is the artical

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  3. Team Moon: How 400,000 People Landed Apollo 11 on the Moon
    by Catherine Thimmesh
    In the Beginning…
    They were going to the moon, all right—at least that was the plan. That was the dream and the challenge set forth by one man, President John F. Kennedy, when he declared in May of 1961,
    “I believe this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to Earth.”
    So they came by the thousands—kids, really, twenty-somethings, a few in their thirties. No one knew for sure how to get to the moon, how to land, or get home. But their goal was clear-cut, and that was enough. That gave them purpose: a reason to puzzle out the problems and seek solutions rather than sleep.
    Kennedy’s decision was triggered by an intense “space race” with the old Soviet Union. The Soviets were first in space (with Sputnik); first too with a man in space. But for those who actually worked on the moon shot, the “race” became an afterthought. They were fueled instead by a desire to explore the heavens—the poetry of it all, the scientific challenge of it all, the “We’re going to the moon!” excitement of it all.
    But the moon? Could it really be done? Right from the get-go, administrators had identified ten thousand individual tasks that would have to be completed. And that was only the beginning. So much to do. Too much? An aide to Kennedy quietly predicted that it would take forty-four attempts. Forty-four tries before ever landing once on the great gray rock in the sky.
    Challenge 2: Almost Empty
    “Sixty seconds!”
    Not sixty-one. No wiggle room. No “just a couple more seconds—we’re almost there.” And no second chances. They had just sixty seconds to land on the moon.
    Absolutely no one expected it to happen. They painstakingly planned so it absolutely wouldn’t-couldn’t happen. But here they were, less than five hundred feet from the moon, and just about plumb out of fuel.
    Robert Carlton, the CONTROL position in Mission Control, who was in charge of monitoring fuel consumption among other things, had just sent the shocking sixty-second notice through the voice chain up to the astronauts. Both Neil and Buzz knew when they heard the words “sixty seconds,” that was how much time remained until they had to abort. Until they had to push the button, fling themselves away from the moon, never to land. Or else, they could possibly die.
    “We wanted to give him [Neil] every chance to land,” explained Robert Carlton. “So we wanted it [the LM] to be as near empty as it could possibly get, but on the other hand, we didn’t want him to run out of gas ten feet from the surface. That would have been a bad thing to do, you know. So you had to hit both. You wanted to make the mission, but you didn’t want to jeopardize your crew, and you wanted to play it just as tight as you could safely.”
    The heavier the spacecraft, the harder it is to launch. And fuel is heavy. So it was critical to pinpoint the fuel needed, add a cushion, then take no more than necessary. But now, because the landing was taking far longer than planned, the fuel was almost gone. Mission Control wanted Neil to take as much time as he needed and fly the LM as near empty as possible only because they wanted him to make the landing. But if he ran out of fuel above the surface, in all likelihood the LM would crash onto the moon. So they were trying to time it to the last possible second before calling an abort—calling off the landing.
    If they aborted, if they flung themselves away from the moon (never to land), they would be slung into lunar orbit, where they would meet up with Mike Collins in the command module and head home to Earth. If they landed, though, leaving the moon wouldn’t be a problem because there was a full tank of fuel in the ascent stage for liftoff (an abort also used the ascent stage). But the ascent and descent stages were completely separate. When the supply for the descent stage was empty, that was it. Sharing fuel was not an option.
    In every simulation, the LM had been landed well before the low-level sensor was tripped, indicating 120 seconds of fuel left. Bob Nance, backroom support for CONTROL, was calculating the seconds of fuel remaining on his paper strip chart. (Flight Director Gene Kranz would write in his memoir, “I never dreamed we would still be flying this close to empty and depending on Nance’s eyeballs.”) Bob Carlton backed up the backup with a stopwatch.
    Thirty seconds!
    Now would not be the time for the two Bobs to miscalculate, miscount, or lose their superhuman powers of concentration. They could not afford to be wrong.
    “When we tripped low level, things really got quiet in that control center,” recalled Bob Carlton. “We were nervous, sweating. Came to sixty seconds, came to thirty seconds, and my eyes were just glued on the stopwatch. I didn’t see [the control center as a whole]. The system could have [fallen] apart at that instant, and I wouldn’t have [known] it. I was just watching the stopwatch.”
    Eighteen seconds!
    Click.
    Challenge 3: Frozen Slug
    After eight challenging years and countless hours, man was finally on the moon. Flight Director Gene Kranz would soon “go around the horn” for the very first Stay/No Stay decision.
    “You know, they landed, and everybody’s cheering and everything and then all of a sudden somebody notices that something’s gone wrong. Temperature’s building up. Uh-oh! It shouldn’t be like that,” explained Grumman engineering manager John Coursen.
    Up, up, up went the temperature in a fuel line on the descent engine. Up, up went the pressure. Rocket science rule number one? Do not allow the fuel to become unstable. Instability equals unpredictability—and unpredictability is just another word for random explosions and all sorts of unwanted chaos.
    from table to table, rushing;
    blueprints and schematics, unfurling;
    telephones, dialing;
    telephones, ringing…
    Do you remember that one test? What about when such and such happened? Remember when so-and-so talked about … Any ideas? …
    At 300 degrees, the fuel was quickly approaching its 400-degree instability rating. Engineers at Grumman, and their counterparts at NASA in Houston (like Grumman manager Tom Kelly), simultaneously deduced the likely culprit: a slug. A solid slug of frozen fuel had trapped a small amount of the descent fuel in the line. This caused the temperature and pressure in the line to rise rapidly—and dangerously.
    “First thing we did was get the drawings out so you could see,” recalled John Coursen. “All kinds of functional diagrams, say of the heat exchanger; the line that runs from there to the valve of the tank. … You want to get all of the data before you that you can; and that’s the purpose for having a good call room back at the plant—because there’s more data there that the people didn’t take with them [to Houston].”
    Up went the pressure, the temperature—now 350 degrees. Terrified of an impending explosion (even a small blast could damage vital engines or components), Coursen and the Grumman engineers argued their options. They could (1) abort now and leave the problems on the moon. (The slug was isolated in the descent stage—and liftoff relied on the separate ascent stage. The descent stage—no longer necessary—would be left behind.) Or they could (2) try to “burp” the engine—give the valve a quick open-close to release the built-up pressure.
    The trouble with option 2 was that the venting might push the fuel to an unstable condition. Or, another possible outcome of the “burping”: what if the landing gear hadn’t deployed correctly? Could any movement, or any resulting burst—no matter how small—tip the LM over? Many a voice in the debate thought the safest option was to abort—now! But that opinion was quickly overruled by the Grumman and NASA leadership (who were confident of the landing gear), and the consensus of the leaders was that it would be safe to gently, gently burp the engine.
    Suddenly, though just as the procedure was about to be relayed to the astronauts, the pressure … the temperature … dropped! And … stayed down. The frozen slug, apparently, had melted! (Probably due to the extreme heat in the fuel line.) Problem solved. And only now—a solid, panic-stricken, gut-wrenching, heart-palpitating ten minutes by clock but feeling like an eternity later—did it sink in for John Coursen, Tom Kelly, and a lot of the other Grumman folks who had poured years of their lives into building the lunar module: Their baby was on the moon. Let the cheering begin!


    by NASA
    July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap for Mankind
    July 1969. It’s a little over eight years since the flights of Gagarin and Shepard, followed quickly by President Kennedy’s challenge to put a man on the moon before the decade is out.
    It is only seven months since NASA’s made a bold decision to send Apollo 8 all the way to the moon on the first manned flight of the massive Saturn V rocket.
    Now, on the morning of July 16, Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins sit atop another Saturn V at Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The three-stage 363-foot rocket will use its 7.5 million pounds of thrust to propel them into space and into history.

    At 9:32 a.m. EDT, the engines fire and Apollo 11 clears the tower. About 12 minutes later, the crew is in Earth orbit.

    After one and a half orbits, Apollo 11 gets a “go” for what mission controllers call “Translunar Injection” -- in other words, it’s time to head for the moon. Three days later the crew is in lunar orbit. A day after that, Armstrong and Aldrin climb into the lunar module Eagle and begin the descent, while Collins orbits in the command module Columbia.

    Collins later writes that Eagle is “the weirdest looking contraption I have ever seen in the sky,” but it will prove its worth.

    When it comes time to set Eagle down in the Sea of Tranquility, Armstrong improvises, manually piloting the ship past an area littered with boulders. During the final seconds of descent, Eagle’s computer is sounding alarms.
    It turns out to be a simple case of the computer trying to do too many things at once, but as Aldrin will later point out, “unfortunately it came up when we did not want to be trying to solve these particular problems.”

    When the lunar module lands at 4:18 p.m. EDT, only 30 seconds of fuel remain. Armstrong radios “Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.” Mission control erupts in celebration as the tension breaks, and a controller tells the crew “You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue, we’re breathing again.”

    Armstrong will later confirm that landing was his biggest concern, saying “the unknowns were rampant,” and “there were just a thousand things to worry about.”

    At 10:56 p.m. EDT Armstrong is ready to plant the first human foot on another world. With more than half a billion people watching on television, he climbs down the ladder and proclaims: “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

    Aldrin joins him shortly, and offers a simple but powerful description of the lunar surface: “magnificent desolation.” They explore the surface for two and a half hours, collecting samples and taking photographs.

    They leave behind an American flag, a patch honoring the fallen Apollo 1 crew, and a plaque on one of Eagle’s legs. It reads, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon. July 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.”

    Armstrong and Aldrin blast off and dock with Collins in Columbia. Collins later says that “for the first time,” he “really felt that we were going to carry this thing off.”

    The crew splashes down off Hawaii on July 24. Kennedy’s challenge has been met. Men from Earth have walked on the moon and returned safely home.

    In an interview years later, Armstrong praises the “hundreds of thousands” of people behind the project. “Every guy that’s setting up the tests, cranking the torque wrench, and so on, is saying, man or woman, ’If anything goes wrong here, it’s not going to be my fault.’”

    In a post-flight press conference, Armstrong calls the flight “a beginning of a new age,” while Collins talks about future journeys to Mars.

    Over the next three and a half years, 10 astronauts will follow in their footsteps. Gene Cernan, commander of the last Apollo mission leaves the lunar surface with these words: “We leave as we came and, god willing, as we shall return, with peace, and hope for all mankind.”
    The bootprints of Apollo are waiting for company.

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  4. But please, its for a test.

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  5. ANYONE?

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  6. :( i got a bad grade):

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  7. answers

    1. a

    2. d

    3.c

    4. a

    5. c

    6.d

    you are welcome!

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  8. I cant, I already submitted the test :(

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  9. I got a 50%:( :( :( :( :(

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  10. sigh* here are the CORRECT answers, Mary:(

    1. A

    2. B

    3. D

    4. A

    5. D

    6. A

    enjoy the correct answers

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  11. ummmmmm its a quiz not a test

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  12. r u talking about the unit test?
    If u r u should have more questions than 6 cuz i have 25 and im gonna cheat if i wanna cheat teacher

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  13. Actually, the answers for connexus are
    A
    D
    A
    B
    A
    D
    When I did @thegirlwiththecorrectanswers it was wrong

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  14. No the answers are
    D
    B
    A
    D
    A
    D

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  15. what are the answers

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  16. bro i got a 1 out of 6 @Anonymous here are the REALLY correct answers

    A
    B
    A
    D
    A
    D

    enjoy the correct answers from someone who actually bothered to go back in the test and look

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  17. here are the REAL ANSWERS
    a
    b
    a
    d
    a
    c

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  18. bruh i dont know which to pick

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  19. the answers are this:
    a
    b
    d
    d
    d
    a
    its the correct ones dude

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  20. g is wrong he got me a 1/6

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  21. OK TRUST ME I'M NOT SURE IF IT CHANGES BUT HERE ARE THE ANSWERS:
    1. B
    2. D
    3. A
    4. B
    5. A
    6. B
    This is arca btw

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  22. poppy got me a 50!!!!!!! ughhh

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  23. 1:D
    2:B
    3:D
    4:C
    5:A
    6:B
    trust me I got a 100 with these anwers

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  24. @therealanswers is wrong I got a 2/6
    Here are the real answers
    1.A
    2.A
    3.B
    4. D
    5. D
    6. B
    If you don't trust me Try and see I promise I'm right
    Give a like if I'm right

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  25. I’ll take the test and tell you guys the CORRECT ANSWERS

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  26. B
    C
    D
    C
    D
    A

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  27. Are you Searching For Website Building, Google Ads, Facebook Ads,craiglist ads,
    classified ads, SMO ,PPC,Do Follow Backlinks,Virtual Number for any country
    Darkweb Marketing Website,Google voice number, Budtrdder Varified Account,
    Youtube ads, Budtrdder ads,Budbay ads,Darkweb Advert, India Mart Account,
    Instagram Followers, BulkForum Posting, High Quality Backlinks etc
    Phone Number: +918404092542

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  28. the corect anwser pls use for connex!!!

    1:b
    2:b
    3:d
    4:d
    5:a
    6:b
    welcom see you next time

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  29. my test has 14 questions not 6 what

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  30. which ones are the answers for 3.6.2 la?

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  31. i have 14Q

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  32. I will give my answers and you can trust me pinky swear promise
    unless they change
    PS: I am talking about the Quiz: Synthesizing Information: Part 2 Quiz

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  33. Here they are
    D
    B
    A
    D
    D
    A
    I wish I knew these were the answers first so I would of got a 100 insteed of a 66. These are the answers swear

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  34. She is correct I got a 100 swear

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  35. told you

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  36. student is correct i got a 83

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  37. OMG EVERYBODY KEEPS PUTTING THE ANSWERS AND THERE WRONG A B A 4 DOES SHOW ANSWERBUT I THINK ITS C D B
    IF THERE RIGHT GIVE ME A BIG WELCOME

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    2. 👎 0

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