AP English

Plato, Symposium
’He who has been instructed thus far in the things of love, and who has learned to see the beautiful in due order and succession, when he comes toward the end will suddenly perceive a nature of wondrous beauty (and this, Socrates, is the final cause of all our former toils)--a nature which in the first place is everlasting, not growing and decaying, or waxing and waning; secondly, not fair in one point of view and foul in another, or at one time or in one relation or at one place fair, at another time or in another relation or at another place foul, as if fair to some and foul to others, or in the likeness of a face or hands or any other part of the bodily frame, or in any form of speech or knowledge, or existing in any other being, as for example, in an animal, or in heaven, or in earth, or in any other place; but beauty absolute, separate, simple, and everlasting, which without diminution and without increase, or any change, is imparted to the ever-growing and perishing beauties of all other things. He who from these ascending under the influence of true love, begins to perceive that beauty, is not far from the end. And the true order of going, or being led by another, to the things of love, is to begin from the beauties of earth and mount upwards for the sake of that other beauty, using these as steps only, and from one going on to two, and from two to all fair forms, and from fair forms to fair practices, and from fair practices to fair notions, until from fair notions he arrives at the notion of absolute beauty, and at last knows what the essence of beauty is.
1. The first sentence can best be described as:
a. a premise upon which the rest of the passage is based. - - - > (I think this is the answer)
b. a syllogism leading to the conclusion in the second sentence.
c. a description of a theoretical reality.
d. a firsthand observation of a phenomenon.
e. a limited observation of specifics.

2. The passage is probably taken from
a. the conclusion to a philosophical argument.
b. the introduction to a philosophical argument.
c. the evidence for a philosophical argument
d. the first part of a syllogism
e. a counterargument against a philosophical argument. - - - > I believe this is the answer

3. We can infer from the first sentence that the passage was taken from a larger argument about:
a. book knowledge vs wisdon
b. education
c. religion
d. love - - - I believe this is the answer
e. free will

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  1. I agree with your answers 1 and 3, not #2. Rethink that one. What does Plato say about the result of all their toil?

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