English

1. He admitted cheating on the test.
2. He admitted that he cheated on the test.
3. He admitted that he had cheated on the test.

cf. He admitted having cheated on the test.

(Does #1 mean #2 or #3?)

4. He admits cheating on the test.
5. He admits that he cheats on the test.
6. He admits that he cheated on the test.
cf. He admits having cheated on the test.

(Does #4 mean #5 or #6?) •English - Writeacher, Saturday, April 30, 2016 at 8:13am
Only #5 is not quite correct. All others are fine, depending on when the cheating took place.
=============
Thank you for your help.

(Does #4 mean #6? or #5?)


4. He admits cheating on the test.
5. He admits that he cheats on the test.
6. He admits that he cheated on the test.

asked by rfvv
  1. Does #4 mean #5 or #6 or else?
    5. He cheats on the test and he admits it. (on that kind of test, regularly)

    6. He cheated on the test and he admits it.

    posted by rfvv
  2. 4 could mean either 5 or 6. If the test was only given once, it means #6. If the test is given repeatedly (as for renewing a driving license, for example), it might mean #5. Either way, he admits that he cheated on the test. In the revised #5, again, if the test is given repeatedly (or the same kind of test). #6 implies a on-time-only test, but COULD be one that is given more than once and he cheated on all of them.

    posted by Reed

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