Physics

Suppose you press a book against the wall with your hand. The book is not moving and you are pushing horizontally. Now suppose you decrease your push, but not enough for the book to slip. What happens to each of the following forces? DO they increase in magnitude, decrease, or not change?
F(push)
Weight
Normal
Friction Force

  1. 👍 0
  2. 👎 0
  3. 👁 134
asked by Rachel
  1. F(push) of course decreases
    The weight, m g, does not change
    Now the normal force against the wall is exactly your push force.
    The maximum friction force is mu, the coefficient of friction, times the normal force. Until the book slips, it is equal to mg, the weight. When mu * F decreases to equal the weight, mg, then the book will start to slip.

    1. 👍 0
    2. 👎 0
    posted by Damon
  2. Here is a way to think about this:
    Think of the book attached to the wall by a frictional hook.
    Until the hook breaks, the hook(friction)holds the book up and the hook (friction) force is exactly equal to the weight because the friction and the weight are the only vertical forces on the book and the book is not accelerating.
    However when the normal force decreases so that mu F = mg, the frictional hook breaks and the book slides down.

    1. 👍 0
    2. 👎 0
    posted by Damon

Respond to this Question

First Name

Your Response

Similar Questions

  1. math

    Book 1 255 book 2 235 book 3 178 book 4 299 book 5 150 book 6 67 book 7 82 book 8 267 book 9 188 book 10 142 book 11 281 book 12 138 book 13 326 book 14 264 book 15 103 ^ number of pages What would be the best graph or display to

    asked by :I on April 30, 2017
  2. physics,

    A student presses a book between his hands The forces that he exerts on the front and back covers of the book are perpendicular to the book and are horizontal. The book weighs 30.8 N. The coefficient of static friction between his

    asked by darren on November 28, 2011
  3. Physics

    A student presses a book between his hands. The forces that he exerts on the front and back covers of the book are perpendicular to the book and are horizontal. The book weighs 31N. The coefficient of static friction between his

    asked by Anonymous on June 11, 2012
  4. Physics

    A student presses a book between his hands, as the drawing indicates. The forces that he exerts on the front and back covers of the book are perpendicular to the book and are horizontal. The book weighs 32 N. The coefficient of

    asked by kelly on February 15, 2010
  5. physics

    A student presses a book between his hands, as the drawing indicates. The forces that he exerts on the front and back covers of the book are perpendicular to the book and are horizontal. The book weighs 30.0 N. The coefficient of

    asked by brian on January 27, 2011
  6. Math

    A book that is 13 in. tall is leaning against the edge of a wall. If the bottom of the book is 5 inches from the wall, how far up the wall is the top of the book?

    asked by Meg on January 27, 2014
  7. Physics

    A student puts a 0.80 kg book against a vertical wall and pushes the book toward the wall with a force of 26N [R]. The book does not move. a) calculate the minimum coefficient of static friction. b) describe two ways the student

    asked by Ika on October 11, 2011
  8. Physics

    A book with a mass of 1350 g is sitting on a desk. The ukf between the book and the desk is .45 and the ukf between the book and the desk is .30. a. how much horizontal force is required to start the book moving across the desk?

    asked by Anonymous on December 12, 2016
  9. physics

    Two books are stacked on top of each other. Book 1 is on top of Book 2. Book 1 has a string attached to it. The string is connected to the wall. The wall is to the left of the stacked Books. Book 2 is pulled to the right with a

    asked by Riley on June 4, 2017
  10. Physics HELP!!

    A student presses a book between his hands, as the drawing indicates. The forces that he exerts on the front and back cover are perpendicular to the book and are horizontal. The book weighs 29.7kg. The coefficient of static

    asked by joane on October 15, 2012

More Similar Questions