L.A

Think about the work you completed in your reading character role. Determine the ideas that would be most worthy to share in a literary discussion about Johnny Tremain. Provide an explanation for your choices. How did the role you selected and the work you completed help you to understand more about the text. Support your response with at least two pieces of evidence from the novel.
Please help :( I'm so confused on this question, but I know the charcter I will be picking is Johnny

  1. 👍
  2. 👎
  3. 👁
  1. Take each instruction one at a time.

    Determine the ideas that would be most worthy to share in a literary discussion about Johnny Tremain.

    Why did you choose these ideas?

    How did the role you selected and the work you completed help you to understand more about the text?

    Support your response with at least two pieces of evidence from the novel.

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
    👤
    Ms. Sue
  2. Ms.Sue your suppose to give people answers not tell them what to do!!!!!

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  3. thank you Ms.Sue it actually kind of helped :) i don't know how but i get it now ...

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  4. And guys just to let you know, at the top of the page it says JISHKA homework HELP... (not homework answers)

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  5. true

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  6. see if I care

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  7. I still don't get it XD

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  8. Alright. Yes Ms. Sue isn't always the nicest but she is a very awesome person. I came hear to CHECK my answers NOT to cheat. And I have my own opinions on cheating if you are really clever you could find my style of writing go on other things I wanted to CHECK NOT CHEAT on my answers. And usually she is very helpful. If you are cheater I AM NOT but if one of you are than don't get mad at Ms. Sue for not giving you the answers.

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  9. Gahh! Seeing all these haregular comments towards Ms.Sue is absolutely disgusting! I know a good lot of kids on this site that go to the same online school that I do. If you are reading this, looking for answers. I know it's hard, I used to get straight A's, but in this program I struggle to gets C's. It's nearing the end of the semester and deadlines are approaching. This school is a fairly difficult one to pass in, the lessons are poorly written and every gosh darn thing you do it graded. Quick checks after each lesson build up. Remember that one quick check, where you missed 1/3? Whay about that other one where you missed 3/4. Sounds like a good score right? Well, it's not at 75%. So if you're a teacher reading this, understand that some kids struggle to same way I do. This program isn't fair, especially in upper grades..

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  10. Can someone just please say the answer this is overdue and needs to be done now

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  11. @Anonymous I agree 100% with you

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  12. @Anonymous I agree

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  13. I have an answer you may use, and this is helpful to thee. Here, you may copy and paste if needed: The story begins in Boston in 1773. Johnny Tremain is a fourteen-year-old silversmith’s apprentice. He works for Mr. Lapham, an aging silversmith, and lives in his house with Mrs. Lapham, the silversmith’s daughter-in-law, and Mrs. Lapham’s four daughters. Johnny is hard-working and good-natured, so he is well-liked by almost everyone and is a leader in the household. Dove, an older apprentice, resents him for this and the two boys often fight. At the beginning of the novel, the pious Mr. Lapham urges Johnny to read a Bible verse about the dangers of pride.

    Later that day, John Hancock, a wealthy merchant, comes to the smithy to order a fancy sugar basin to match his existing silverware. Johnny is impressed by the work on the existing set and is surprised to find out that Mr. Lapham made it in his youth. Because Mr. Lapham is getting old and has lost some of his skill, Johnny must help him to make the sugar basin.

    That night, Johnny goes walking on the Long Wharf with Cilla and Isannah, the two youngest Lapham daughters. He tells them about his past. His mother died when he was fourteen, shortly before he was apprenticed to Mr. Lapham. She was from Maine originally, but moved to Boston so that Johnny could learn to read and pursue a profitable trade. She always told him that he was related to the Lytes, a wealthy merchant family in Boston. If he was ever desperate for money, he could go to them and ask for help, using a silver cup she had as proof of the relationship. Johnny shows the cup to Cilla.

    Johnny takes his mold of the sugar basin to Paul Revere, a master silversmith, for advice. Mr. Revere gives him some tips about how to make the basin better, and offers to hire Johnny if he ever needs more employment. Johnny is in a hurry to perfect the handle before it is due to Mr. Hancock on Monday, so with the help of Mrs. Lapham, he works on it on Sunday (something he is not supposed to do because it is the Sabbath). Dove and Dusty Miller, the younger apprentice, are supposed to help Johnny. However, they are annoyed by his pompous attitude so they give him a cracked crucible to put the melted silver in. The trick was supposed to be a silly practical joke to humiliate Johnny a little, but he spills melted silver all over himself and badly burns his hand. Mrs. Lapham hires Gran’ Hopper, a midwife, to heal Johnny, but she fails to keep his hand flat so it curls in on itself and becomes useless. Johnny can never be a silversmith now.

    The Laphams allow Johnny to continue living with them until he finds a new job, although they make it clear that he is a burden and they need his room for their new assistant, Mr. Tweedle––a rude man who Johnny despises. Only Cilla, to whom he was betrothed before the accident, is still kind to him. Johnny tries to look for work, but his bad attitude and his injury prevent him from getting many job offers. When he gets offers for unskilled jobs, he turns them down because he believes they are beneath him. One of these unskilled jobs is work as a delivery boy for The Boston Observer, a paper that is critical of the British colonial government and advocates for rebellion. Although Johnny does not want to be a delivery boy, he befriends a printer’s apprentice at the newspaper named Rab. When he asks for work from John Hancock, Hancock rejects Johnny because he cannot write. But once the great merchant realizes that he caused Johnny’s injury by ordering the sugar basin, he sends Johnny a heavy purse full of silver.

    Johnny uses the money to buy presents for Cilla and Isannah, but when he is giving her some limes, Isannah screams at the sight of his deformed hand. Johnny is deeply hurt and runs away from home, sleeping in the cemetery that night. He decides he is desperate enough to ask for help from Merchant Lyte. Although Merchant Lyte has a bad reputation and Rab is skeptical about the plan, Johnny goes to the merchant’s house with the cup. Merchant Lyte and his daughter, Miss Lavinia Lyte, laugh at Johnny and have him arrested for stealing the cup, believing this is part of a plot to trick them out of their riches. Johnny is arrested and sent to jail, and Merchant Lyte tries to bribe the Laphams not to help him.

    Although the penalty for stealing is death, Rab helps Johnny to escape this fate. He accomplishes this by convincing Josiah Quincy, a Whig lawyer, to defend Johnny for free, and by getting Cilla to the trial in time to testify that Johnny showed her the cup before Merchant Lyte says it was stolen. Isannah also appears at the trial, impressing the spectators with her testimony on Johnny’s behalf. Miss Lavinia is particularly impressed by Isannah’s adorable face and hair. Johnny is found innocent and everyone goes out to dinner to celebrate. It comes out that Rab is a member of the Sons of Liberty, a group of anti-British youths who use mob violence and intimidation to fight back against the English government. Later, Johnny tries to sell the silver cup to Merchant Lyte since he no longer has any use for it, but Merchant Lyte steals it from him.

    Johnny accepts the job as a delivery boy for the Boston Observer, and Rab teaches him how to ride Goblin, the company horse. Goblin is a good horse but extremely skittish and difficult to ride. But with practice, Johnny develops a friendship with the beautiful horse and impresses everyone with his riding skills. He begins to deliver the newspapers and in doing so, learns about politics and becomes a Whig––that is, a supporter of the rebels. He learns that the newspaper’s attic hosts the meetings of the Boston Observers, a group of important rebels including Paul Revere, John Hancock, Sam Adams, and others. As he becomes absorbed in his new life, he gradually becomes distant from Cilla, although he sees her occasionally and they remain friends.

    In autumn 1773, the colonists become very upset because England wants to add a tax to tea. They refuse to pay taxes without political representation. Johnny, Rab, and Uncle Lorne all participate in the build-up to the great protest against this tax, the Boston Tea Party. Johnny acts as a messenger; Rab recruits boys to help storm the tea ships in the harbor; and Uncle Lorne prints posters and pamphlets urging the people to rise up against the tax. Johnny sees Miss Lavinia around town occasionally and feels very attracted to her beauty. On the night of the Tea Party, Johnny and Rab help throw the tea off of the ships and clean up afterwards to maintain a good image for the rebels. Although the protest mostly goes well, Johnny is put off by Sam Adams’s apparent appetite for violence, and the cruelty with which some Tories are treated.

    The British place Boston under martial law, but Uncle Lorne continues to publish the Observer and other Whig publications. Rab becomes obsessed with getting a good musket to fight the British. One day, he accidentally touches a musket while showing Johnny how it works and is punished with a hard on the head. The British medical officer who helps Rab offers Johnny work as a delivery boy, so Johnny becomes a spy, using his job to get information and pass it to the rebels. In his free time, Johnny takes care of Goblin at the stables. One day, he notices that Dove has started to work at the stables as well; he was fired by the silversmith and now works for Colonel Smith, a high-ranking British officer. Rab insists that Johnny befriend Dove because he might have useful information about impending British actions. Johnny reluctantly obeys.

    A British officer named Lieutenant Stranger tries to commandeer Goblin, only to find the horse too skittish for his needs. However, he offers to give Johnny lessons on how to jump with Goblin in Boston Common. Johnny slowly bonds with the British officer, although he never forgets his Whig loyalties. One day, Johnny finds out that Cilla and Isannah have gone to work as servants for the Lytes, and Mrs. Lapham has married Mr. Tweedie. Miss Lavinia has taken Isannah under her wing; she loves the little girl for her angelic beauty. She is a bad influence on Isannah’s character; the girl runs around half-clothed in mixed company and speaks saucily to Johnny. Johnny meets Mrs. Bessie, a servant of the Lytes who is secretly a Whig, though her masters are Tories.

    A few weeks after they go to spend the summer at their country house in Milton, the Lytes return to Boston after being chased by a rebel mob. Johnny goes back to Milton with Cilla to fetch the Lytes’ silver so it won’t be stolen. In the empty country house, Johnny discovers a family Bible with evidence that his mother was in fact related to the Lytes. He tears out the page with the family tree and burns it, saying it no longer matters if he is related to the Lytes or not. When they get back to Boston, Johnny and Cilla have a romantic moment and talk about what it would be like to be married.

    The Boston Observers hold one last meeting and discuss a recent conflict. The British have gone to the countryside to seize rebel gunpowder. Although the Minute Men arrived too late to stop them, the Observers are impressed by the turnout. They believe that they will be successful in repelling further British advances. James Otis, an Observer who has fallen out of favor, shows up to the meeting and gives a passionate speech about how violence is undesirable but necessary so that “a man can stand up” (193). Paul Revere is put in charge of spying and getting warning to outlying towns if the British decide to advance. Johnny uses his connection to Dove to learn about an impending raid on Portsmouth. He tells Paul Revere about this which leads to Revere’s famous midnight ride to warn the rebels.

    One day, Johnny is nearly flogged by an unfriendly British officer. Pumpkin, a young British enlisted man whom Johnny knows from the stables, helps him escape. In return, Johnny offers to help Pumpkin desert. Pumpkin wants to do this because he is a Whig and loves America. He would rather be a farmer than fight for the British. Johnny gives Pumpkin some farmer’s clothes and puts him in touch with a farmer who will hide him from the British. He only asks if he can have Pumpkin’s musket. Pumpkin agrees to the exchange, and Johnny gives the musket to Rab. However, several weeks later, Johnny sees Pumpkin being executed for desertion in Boston Common. Johnny is terrified by the gunshots and the muskets and is relieved that his deformed hand will prevent him from ever going into battle.

    It is now April, 1775. The British are preparing for an assault on Lexington and Concord, and the political climate in Boston has become very volatile. Johnny works as a messenger for Paul Revere and his fellow Observer Dr. Warren. Rab sneaks out of Boston to go to Lexington and fight with the militia there. Johnny is worried that Rab is too eager to put himself in a dangerous situation. Dove accidentally reveals information to Johnny about when Colonel Smith plans to lead the assault. Johnny passes this information on to Paul Revere, who arranges for two lanterns to be hung in Christ’s Church––a signal to the rebels in Charlestown to prepare to fight. That night, the first shots of the American Revolution are fired at Lexington.

    The British soldiers win at Lexington because they vastly outnumber the rebels, so they move on to Concord and North Bridge to seize rebel supplies. The British try to arrest Uncle Lorne for sedition, but he hides successfully in a feather bed. Johnny takes Pumpkin’s old uniform and goes to Charlestown to tell Dr. Warren the news from Boston. Before he leaves, he and Cilla share their first kiss at the Lytes’ house. Miss Lavinia is fleeing the country and taking Isannah with her to London. This upsets Johnny, but she tries to make amends with him by informing him that he really is related to the Lytes. They honestly did not know he was until Lavinia did some research after seeing Johnny’s widow’s peak. It turns out that Johnny’s mother, “Vinny” Lyte, was expelled from the family after marrying a French prisoner of war, Johnny’s father. Lavinia offers him some of the Lyte property if any of it is left after the Revolution.

    Johnny goes to Charlestown and then walks to Lexington in order to find Rab. Although the British succeeded in raiding Concord, they were stopped in North Bridge by a massive group of Minute Men. When he gets to Lexington, Johnny learns that Rab was shot in the first volley of bullets. He visits the dying Rab at a tavern, where he is attended by Dr. Warren. The young men share a warm moment of friendship. Rab thanks Johnny for the musket and is only saddened that he couldn’t use it before he was wounded. He then sends Johnny on an errand so his younger friend won’t have to be present when he dies. When Johnny returns, he takes the news stoically and allows Dr. Warren to look at his deformed hand. Dr. Warren realizes that he can cut away the scar tissue and give Johnny back the use of his thumb. Although the operation will be painful, Johnny quickly agrees to it and goes for a walk while Dr. Warren readies his supplies. As he passes through the Lexington countryside, he thinks how proud he is of America and is people.

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  14. Connexus students: If you go to L1 of U4 and go to pg. 4, you can find a download called reading roles. It tells you what each role is, and gives you questions to ask yourself about the novel.

    To save you some time, here are the roles:

    Discussion Director
    As Discussion Director, you will think about the
    following:
    • What images come to mind as you read?
    • If you could interview the author, what
    question would you ask? Why?
    • Predict what will happen next and why.
    (Note: Prediction may not apply for
    informational texts.)

    Word Watcher
    As Word Watcher, you will think about the
    following:
    • What new words did you find in this
    selection?
    • What words are used frequently?
    • What words are used in unusual ways?

    Summarizer
    As Summarizer, you will think about the
    following:
    • What are the key facts and/or main ideas
    in this selection?
    • If you were to come up with an essay
    topic for this selection, what main idea
    would you choose? Write an essay
    question or prompt.

    Luminary
    As Luminary, you will think about the following:
    • Which part of the reading (e.g., an
    interesting fact, a piece of dialogue, an
    event) really struck you? Why?

    Connector
    As Connector, you will think about the following:
    • Connect what you have read so far with
    things you have experienced at home or
    in your personal life.
    • Connect what you have read so far to
    what is going on in the world right now.
    • Connect what you have read to the Big
    Question.

    Steps to completing the actual essay question:
    1st. Pick a role and answer the questions for that role.
    2nd. Break the question down.
    a. Determine the ideas (from what you did in your reading role) that would be most worthy to share in a literary discussion about Johnny Tremain.
    b. Provide an explanation for WHY you chose those ideas, and give examples from the novel that go along with your ideas.
    c. Explain how the reading role and the work you completed for it helped you understand the novel.

    Uni-Clair gave you some sentence starters, and they are actually very helpful. Change them a bit and fill in the blanks:
    a. For my reading role I picked to be a...
    b. The ideas I seem most worthy to share would be that...
    c. My reading role helped me...

    I understand my comment is long, but it's helpful.

    P.S. These are at the end of each semester of Language Arts. You do the exact same things, the reading roles are the same, but the books are different. You can use the above comment as a template for each one (including next semester - the Giver).

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  15. If you didn't read the book, go to sparknotes. It's like cliff notes, but online. You can find the context, plot overview, character list, themes, motifs, symbols, the summary for each chapter individually, explanations of important quotes, key ideas/facts, study questions, essay topics, quizzes, etc.

    1. 👍
    2. 👎
  16. So pick a reading role. I chose to use the summarizer. So then, explain why you chose to use your role and how it helped you understand the text and give examples. So if it said something you didn't know use your reading role to help you figure it out and then think about how u figured it out and put the line of text you had trouble with in there. If you didn't read it here's a summary oh it.

    In colonial Boston, a young silversmith's apprentice injures his hand, and finds himself befriended by the Sons of Liberty and caught up in events of the American Revolution.

    While orphan Johnny Tremain is apprenticed to silversmith Emphraim Lapham, he violates the Sabbath laws by working on Sunday. He suffers an injury to his hand that ends his career as an artisan. He then goes to the home of rich merchant Jonathon Lyte with a silver cup given to him by his dead mother to prove than Lyte is his uncle. The merchant accuses him of having stolen it, and Johnny is falsely accused of being a fraud and thief. After being exonerated he is befriended by Rab, a young man who introduces him to the Sons of Liberty, a group of colonists who meet secretly to plot strategy against what they consider tyrannical English rule. Young Johnny becomes involved with patriots like Sam Adams, Paul Revere, and James Otis and participates in the Boston Tea Party and the Battles of Lexington and Concord.

    Johnny Tremain is drawn into the Revolutionary War, and becomes a patriot fighting to free the colonies from England. Along the way he learns about life and about himself.

    1. 👍
    2. 👎

Respond to this Question

First Name

Your Response

Similar Questions

  1. Language arts

    . This question asks about your work in your reading role. You may use your novel to help you answer the question. Think about the work you completed in your reading role. Determine the ideas that would be most worthy to share in

  2. English

    Match the vocabulary words with the appropriate definitions. A.allusion B.flat character C.rhyme scheme D.stock character E.round character unchanging character-B reference to other works or events-A complex or main character-E a

  3. Literature / Language Arts

    Think about the work you completed in your reading character role. Determine the ideas that would be most worthy to share in a literary discussion about Johnny Tremain. Provide an explanation for your choices. How did the role you

  4. LA

    Think about the work you completed in your reading character role. Determine the ideas that would be most worthy to share in a literary discussion about Johnny Tremain. Provide an explanation for your choices. How did the role you

  1. English

    12. This question has two parts: 1. List some important ideas that The Cay includes. Why did you choose those ideas? 2. Tell how using a reading role helped you understand the book. The reading roles are described in the link on

  2. Language Arts

    This question asks about your work in your reading character role. You may use your novel to help you answer the question. Think about the work you completed in your reading character role. Determine the ideas that would be most

  3. lang arts

    Think about the work you completed in your reading role. Determine the ideas that would be most worthy to share in a literary discussion about The Giver. Provide an explanation for your choices. How did the role you selected and

  4. Language

    List some important ideas that Johnny Tremain includes. Why did you choose those ideas? Tell how using a reading role helped you understand the book. The reading roles are described in the link on Unit 4 lesson 1 slide 4. Support

  1. English

    1.List some important ideas that Johnny Tremain includes. Why did you choose those ideas. 2.Tell how using a reading role helped you understand the book. The reading roles are described in the link on unit 4 lesson 1 slide 4.

  2. English

    I did not know what to do. I could not afford to be seen walking with her, and I did not even want to-but on the other hand the flattery of those humble, hopeful turnings was not lost on me. A role was shaping for me I could not

  3. math

    Mike completed 19 math problems before dinner for tonight’s homework, and he completed x problems after dinner. Write an expression to determine the total number of problems he completed.

  4. English

    tell how using a reading role helped you understand the book. The reading roles are described in the link of unit 4, lesson 1, slide 4. support your response with at least two pieces of evidence from the novel. This is for Johnny

You can view more similar questions or ask a new question.