Physics

Two bicyclists, starting at the same place, are riding toward the same campground by different routes. One cyclist rides 1030 m due east and then turns due north and travels another 1480 m before reaching the campground. The second cyclist starts out by heading due north for 1950 m and then turns and heads directly toward the campground. (a) At the turning point, how far is the second cyclist from the campground? (b) In what direction (measured relative to due east within the range (-180¢ª, 180¢ª]) must the second cyclist head during the last part of the trip?

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asked by Shant
  1. a. d^2=X^2 + Y^2=1030^2 + (1950-1480)^2
    = 1,281,800
    d = 1132 m.

    b. Tan A = Y/X = (1950-1480)/1030 =
    0.45631
    A = 24.5o S. of E.

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    posted by Henry
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