Chemistry

Label each of the following as endothermic or exothermic

A.) Products are more stable than reactants
B.) Kinetic energy is converted into potential energy
C.) Evaporation
D.) Combustion
E.) Water freezes
F.) Heat seems to disappear

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  1. And you think what? and why?

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    posted by DrBob222
  2. Well, I think that A is exothermic because I know for a fact that in an exothermic chart the products are always lower in P.E than the reactants. I'm really not sure about all of the other questions though.

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  3. I think you're right about A.
    Wouldn't you need to work to make KE into PE?
    C. To evaporate H2O you must add heat so that must be endo.
    D. If you burn a piece of wood that is combustion. It gets hot, right? So that must be?
    E. When water freezes it is exothermic. No, I didn't make a typo.
    ice + heat ==> liquid H2O which is endothermic, right? So the reverse of that must be exothermic.
    F.I don't know how to interpret F.

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    posted by DrBob222

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