Math

posted by .

What does it mean to say that two variables are negatively correlated?

  • Math -

    as one increases, the other decreases.

  • Math -

    Thanks for your help steve

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

  1. Statistics

    I neep help on two questions! A condition that occurs in multiple regression analysis if the independent variables are themselves correlated is known as: 1. autocorrelation 2. stepwise regression 3. multicorrelation 4. multicollinearity …
  2. Statistics

    Explain the meaning of the following three statements: "The self-confidence of that group of recruits is negatively correlated with their chances of getting through the course." Thanks
  3. college

    What is an example of two variables that are likely to be correlated because they are both changing over time?
  4. Econometrics

    Consider a linear model with unobserved beterogeneity (q) and measurement error in an explanatory variable: y = B0 + B1x1 + ... + Bkx*k + q + v where ek = xk - x*k is the measurement error and we set the coefficient on q equal to one …
  5. Statistics

    when two variables are correlated it means that one is the cause of the other. true or false?
  6. math

    When two variables are correlated, it means that one is the cause of the other.
  7. EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY help me asap

    what does it mean to say that two variables are negatively correlated?
  8. Sentences

    Is "negative correlated" used correctly in this sentence?
  9. Comm Tech

    1.)what does it mean to say that two variables are negatively correlated A.)When one variable increases, the other decreases. B.)When variable increases, the other also C.)When one variable decreases, the other also decfreases D.)Both …
  10. Algebra 1

    Given the data set for the length of time a person has been jogging and the person's speed, hypothesize a relationship between the variables. a) I would expect the data to be positively correlated b) I would expect the data to be negatively …

More Similar Questions