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Latin Practice

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Can you give me some basic sentences that I can turn masculine plural and singular and vice versa?

Like, The man was tired. The man walked in the fields slowly. etc.

  • Latin Practice -

    First, let me give you some very useful websites:

    http://www.usu.edu/markdamen/Latin1000/index.htm

    http://latin-dictionary.net/ (dictionary)

    http://econrad.net/latin/ (grammar)

  • Latin Practice -

    Make the subject of each sentence plural and be sure to adjust the verb and any adjectives so it/they agree with the new subject:

    Puer ad urbem ambulabat.

    Filia matrem amat.

    Puella est pulchra.

    -----------------------

    Change the following subject to singular, and be sure to adjust other words as needed.

    Patres filiorum ambulabant et clamabant.

  • Latin Practice -

    Pueri ad urbem ambulabant.

    Filiae matrem amatae.

    Puellae est pulchrae.

  • Latin Practice -

    Pueri ad urbem ambulabant. Good

    Filiae matrem amatae. Re-think that verb!

    Puellae est pulchrae. Re-think that verb!

  • Latin Practice -

    Puellae est pulchrant?

  • Latin Practice -

    Im confused on masculine words especially.


    I don't get the US ending such as

    viri defessus

  • Latin Practice -

    You need to be clear about which words are verbs and which are adjectives.

    Puella est pulchra = The girl is pretty.

    Why would you say, "The girls is... " and then tack a verb ending on an adjective? Puella and pulchra match because both are feminine, singular, nominative. The verb "est" is singular to match the subject.

    If you change the subject to Puellae, what must you change in the adjective so it matches? And what must the verb become so that it reads "are" and not "is"?

  • Latin Practice -

    Singular to plural:

    Puer ad urbem ambulabat. ~~> Pueri ad urbem ambulabant.

    Filia matrem amat. ~~> Filiae matrem amant.

    Puella est pulchra. ~~> Puellae sunt punchrae.

  • Latin Practice -

    Plural to singular:

    Patres filiorum ambulabant et clamabant. ~~> Pater filii ambulabat et clamabat.

  • Latin Practice -

    This
    Puella est pulchra
    would turn into this plural:


    Puellae sunt pulchrae,

    correct? its the masculines I can't get down

  • Latin Practice -

    Correct:

    Puella est pulchra
    would turn into this plural:

    Puellae sunt pulchrae,


    [I see a typo in what I posted above ... several, actually!!)

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