Chemistry

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List the sets of quantum numbers which describe all of the electrons possible in a 6p wave function (orbital):

I'm really having trouble figuring this out!

  • Chemistry -

    Remember these rules.
    6p means n = 6 and p means l = 1.
    ml = -l to +l in increments of 1 and that includes zero. In practice all that means is that ml can be -1, or 0, or +1.
    Then remember that ms can be +/- 1/2 for each ml value.

  • Chemistry -

    I'm really bad at this, I still don't understand.

  • Chemistry -

    There isn't anything to understand. There are four (4) quantum numbers and they have rules to follow:
    1. The value of n may be 1,2,3,4,5 or any whole number larger than 0 but may not be zero.

    2. The value of l may be any whole number but may not be larger than n-1. Therefore, for n = 1, l may be zero. For n = 2, l may be 0 or 1. For n = 3, l may be 0, 1, or 2, etc. If l = 0 we call it an s electron. If l = 1 we call it a p electron. If l = 2 we call it a d electron and if l = 3 we call it an f electron.

    3.The value of ml may have values from -l to +l, all in whole numbers, including zero.

    4. The value of ms may be +/- 1/2.

    Your question doesn't need all of this to answer it but I thought it might be useful to write ALL of the rules, then you apply these rules to the question.
    6 is the n value.
    p means l = 1

    So we can have
    n = 6
    l = 1
    ml = -1
    Ms +1/2 and -1/2 (Two electrons here with values of n, l, m the same and the only difference is ms is +1/2 for 1 electron and -1/2 for the other.)

    n = 6
    l = 1
    ml = 0
    ms = +1/2 and -1/2 (Two more electrons here.)

    n = 6
    l = 1
    ml = +1
    ms = +1/2 and -1/2 (Two more electrons)
    There are six electrons possible. That's all of the p electrons an atom can have for any given value of n

  • Chemistry -

    Yeah, I figured it out after I said I didn't understand. It's actually really easy. Thanks for all your help though!

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