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A 50 gram ice cube is cooled to -10oC in the freezer. How many calories of heat are required to heat it until it becomes liquid water at 20oC? (The specific heat of ice is 0.5 cal/goC.)
Answer
A) 1250 cal.
B) 4000 cal.
C) 5000 cal.
D) 5250 cal.

Can someone please help me solve this by helping me out with the formula

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