physics

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String instrument players can tune one string off of another - once you are happy with the tension and resulting pitch in one lower string, you put your finger down partway up the first string at the appropriate spot to make a higher pitch, one which should match the fundamental pitch of the next string over. If the second string is almost, but not quite properly tuned, you will hear beats. Suppose you are doing this, and hear one beat every 0.88 s when trying to adjust the second string. If the first string (with your finger on it) is playing at 114 Hz how far off in frequency is the second string?

I figured 100Hz incorrect

  • physics -

    The beat frequency is 1/0.88 = 1.14 Hz.

    That equals the difference in frequencies

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