Physics-Newton's Law

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Hi-I have a question-we're studying Newton's Laws and my question is:
If I have a constant, non-zero force, how does the accleration change as the mass is changed.

I think it changes proportionally-yes, or no but I'm not sure why except to say that's the law

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