Chemistry

posted by .

What does it mean to say that a solution is saturated with a solute? (Select all that apply.)

a) A solute that is at equilibrium with undissolved solvent.
b) A solvent that is at equilibrium with solute.
c) A solution contains the maximum amount of solvent possible at a particular temperature.
d) A solute that is at equilibrium with solvent.
e) A solvent without any bonding twists in its molecules.
f) A solution contains the maximum amount of solute possible at a particular temperature.
g) A solute without any bonding twists in its molecules.
h) A saturated solution is one that is at equilibrium with undissolved solute.

I chose b,d and f but I'm told I'm wrong. I am pretty sure f should be chosen, but can't see why I'd be wrong with the other two because they're saying the same thing, aren't they?

Thanks!

  • Chemistry -

    When a question like this says to pick all that apply, one never knows exactly how picky to be about the answers.

    b doesn't apply at all. The only connection is that one must have a solvent to have a solution.

    d--I'm not exactly sure what that means.

    f--I've used this often; however, it isn't true in supersaturated solution. Those contain MORE than is possible and that always sounds so contradictory.

    h is the closest to a correct answer I can see. The solute is solution in equilibrium with undissolved solute.

  • Chemistry -

    I don't understand... doesn't an undissolbed solute in a solution mean that the solute didn't mix in with the solution, and doesn't that then mean that it's not a solution? Like oil and water?

  • Chemistry -

    Not at all.
    If I place AgCl, as an example, in water, shake and stir until equilibrium is attained, I will have aome AgCl in solution as Ag^+ and Cl^-, I will have some AgCl (undissociated) dissolved in the solvent, water, and I will have some solid AgCl that will settle to the bottom of the beaker. That will be a saturated solution.
    A slightly different example: sugar and water.
    If I place a spoonful of table sugar in water (let's say 250 mL), and shake and stir until all of it is dissolved, I will have a solution of sugar in water. Placing more sugar in the water, if it dissolves completely, makes a more concentrated SOLUTION of sugar. If I keep adding sugar, and it keeps dissolving, I simply prepare a more and more concentrated solution. At some point, however, the water holds as much sugar as it can and no more sugar will dissolve, no matter how long I stir or how long I shake. At that point, we have a saturated solution. To KNOW we have a saturated solution, we must SEE some undissolved sugar at the bottom of the beaker. There will be an equilibrium between the sugar molecule in solution and the sugar molecules at the bottom of the beaker. This is not a static equilibrium but a dynamic one in which a few sugar molecules are dissolving and an equal number of dissolved molecules are recrystallizing at the bottom of the beaker. The net, however, is that no matter how much more sugar we add, no more will go into solution. The additional sugar will add to that already collected at the bottom of the beaker. I hope I've not taken your question our of context since there were four or five possible scenarios from the answers. Please follow up if needed.

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

  1. Chemistry

    I have to match the items to the statements below, and I'm stuck! A Dilute B Unsaturated C Saturated D Supersaturated 1. Sodium acetate solution after the excess solute fell out of solution. 2. There is visible solute on the bottom …
  2. chemistry

    Which of the following is NOT true for solutes and solvents?
  3. chemistry

    Which of the following can be determined if the boiling-point elevation, the mass of solute and the molality of a given solution are known. The identity of the solute The polarity of the solute The size of a molecule of the solute …
  4. science

    solubility equillibrium is dynamic equillibrium between undissolved excess solute and solvent or aqueous solution and crystal in a saturated solution. so rate of dissolving = rate of crystalization if any more solute is added it will …
  5. CHEM

    Explain how micelles and more complex solutions work. Consider all Solute-solute, Solvent-solute and Solvent-solvent interactions in such a system.
  6. chemistry

    The molecular mass of a substance was determined by the freezing point depression technique. The minimum data required for the determination are a. delta Tf and Kf only. b. delta Tf , Kf and mass of solute. c. delta Tf , Kf , mass …
  7. Chemistry

    1) The molecular mass of a substance was determined by the freezing point depression technique. The minimum data required for the determination are a. ƒ´Tf and Kf only. b. ƒ´Tf , Kf and mass of solute. c. ƒ´Tf , Kf , mass of …
  8. chemistry

    1. When the energy released by the formation of solute-solvent attractions is greater than the energy absorbed by overcoming solute-solute and solvent-solvent attractions, the dissolving process ____. 2. Mixtures are classified according …
  9. chemistry

    a. Find the amount of solute based on this information Volume = 500 ml Concentration of solution= 15% (w/w) Solute (molar mass) = H2SO4 is 98.0g/mol b. Find the molar mass Amount of solute= 117.0g Volume of solution= 2.00L concentration …
  10. chemistry

    a. Find the amount of solute based on this information Volume = 500 ml Concentration of solution= 15% (w/w) Solute (molar mass) = H2SO4 is 98.0g/mol b. Find the molar mass Amount of solute= 117.0g Volume of solution= 2.00L concentration …

More Similar Questions