Chemistry

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In lab we conducted a calorimetry experiment with a peanut. We burned a half a peanut and placed it underneath a pop can with 50mL of water inside. One of our questions is why heat transfer to the pop can isn't accounted for when calculating heat generated and why it's reasonable. Can anyone explain how this is because I would think that it's unreasonable.

  • Chemistry -

    Consider the mass of the Al can (it's small) and the heat capacity of the can (it's small). Then compare that with 50 mL of water, it's heat capacity and the temperature difference.

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