Physics

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If I wanted to right

SIGMA F = ma

in the proper notation
what would I put above and below SIGMA

Would I put a lower case "n" above SIGMA and "i = 0" below it and then put a subscript "i" under the "F"

thank you I have been woundering about this as it makes sense to include these in stuff like stats so I do not see why we don't include them in physics can you please tell me what goes above and below SIGMA in this situation?

Thanks

  • Physics -

    It depends on the context.

    If you are working on a problem where there are 9 forces on one mass, then you would put

    Σ Fi= ma
    and put i=1 at the bottom and 9 at the top.

    If this is a general equation to indicate that the forces acting on the mass must be summed together, then no indication of the limits is required.

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