Chem

posted by .

I don't understand the effect of temperature on a reaction. For exmaple:

CO + 3H2 <-> CH4 + H2O deltaH= -230 KJ

If there were an increase in temperature then the CH4 and H2O would have a harding time becoming the CO and H2 so therefore the reaction would move to the right. Is that right?

  • Chem -

    Here is a tip. Always replace the -delta H or + delta H like this.
    CO + 3H2 <==>CH4 + H2O + heat (if delta H were + it means the reaction is endothermic instead of exothermic and I would have written heat on the left side with the reactants. Now that the heat is placed properly, just answer as you would for any change in concentration of the molecules. So adding heat to the reacting makes the reaction shift so as to use up the heat and that means the reaction shifts to the left. (You see that CH4 + H2O + heat makes the reactants and heat is used to do that so the reaction moves to the left.)

  • Chem -

    Ohh wow, what an awesome tip! Thank you so much. This was so confusing until now :D

    So for something like (losing heat)
    2A + B <-> 2C delta H postive
    it would be
    2A + B <-> 2C -heat
    the reaction would move right?

  • Chem -

    Yes, but since negative signs can be confusing, I would write it as
    2A + B + heat <==> 2C, then adding heat makes the reaction shift to the right. That way the rules I follow stay the same; i.e., it moves AWAY from what is being added. So adding A or B or heat would make it move to the right; adding C or cooling it would make it move to the left

  • Chem -

    Thank You :)

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

  1. chemistry

    Consider this balanced equation 3H2+CO -> CH4+H2O. how many moles of CH4 can be obtained by reached 2.0mol of H2 with 2.0molCO according to this equation?
  2. chemistry

    The initial concentration for the compounds involved in the reaction displayed were determined to be [CH4(g)] = 0.9530 mol/L, [H2O(g)] = 0.9911 mol/L, [CO(g)] = 0.7474 mol/L, [H2(g)] = 0.2717 mol/L. Calculate the value of the equilibrium …
  3. College Chemistry

    The initial concentration for the compounds involved in the reaction shown were determined to be [CH4(g)] = 0.6616 mol/L, [H2O(g)] = 0.8127 mol/L, [CO(g)] = 0.9566 mol/L, [H2(g)] = 0.7688 mol/L. Calculate the value of the equilibrium …
  4. Idontgetit

    The value of the equilibrium constant, Kc, at a certain temperature is 2.56 x 10-1. If the reaction quotient for a mixture of these species at the same temperature is found to be 9.90 x 10-4, would the mixture yield more products, …
  5. Idontgetit

    The value of the equilibrium constant, Kc, at a certain temperature is 2.56 x 10-1. If the reaction quotient for a mixture of these species at the same temperature is found to be 9.90 x 10-4, would the mixture yield more products, …
  6. help

    Methane, CH4, burns in oxygen gas to form water and carbon dioxide. What is the correct balanced chemical equation for this reaction?
  7. Chemistry

    Calculate Delta H for the reaction CH4(g)+NH3(g)-->HCN(g)+3H2(g) given, N2(g)+3H2(g)->2NH3(g) DeltaH=-91.8kj C(s)+2H2(g)->CH3(g) DeltaH=-74.9kj h2(g)+2C(s)+N2(g)->2HCN(g) DeltaH=270.3kj
  8. chemistry

    At 1500 °C, Kc = 5.67 for the reaction CH4(g) + H2O(g) CO(g) + 3H2(g) Calculated value of ΔG°1773 for the reaction at this temperature.
  9. Physical Science

    Hi! Thanks for checking my question out! ____ 1. Methane, CH4, burns in oxygen gas to form water and carbon dioxide. What is the correct balanced chemical equation for this reaction?
  10. Chem help

    Consider the following system, which is at equilibrium, CO(g) + 3 H2(g) <--------> CH4(g) + H2O(g). The result of removing some CH4(g) and H2O(g) from the system will be A. more CH4 is consumed to restore the equilibrium B. Kc …

More Similar Questions