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The separation of P-waves and S-waves on a seismogram recorded 4500 km from the epicenter of an earthquake is six minutes. On another seismogram that separation is seven minutes. Is the second station closer to or more distant from the epicenter? Explain.

  • Science -

    What do you think? As the S and P waves travel away fom the epicenter, the distance between them increases.

  • Science -

    I have no idea , that's why I came on this site obviously .

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