Calculus

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Consider a plane curve which is described in polar coordinates (r, @) by r = g(@) for @ for all [a,b] (@ representing theta).

Starting from the known expression for the length of a plane curve in Cartesian coordinates and the equation x = rcos@, y = rsin@, obtain an integral expression in terms of the function g and the numbers a and b for the length of the given curve.

How would I do this question. Thanks.

  • Calculus -

    Paging a math expert! Would some math expert come in please?!

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