Astronomy

posted by .

Suppose that, in the future, observations with some new telescope reveal a planet about 16 AU from a star whose mass is the same as our sun's mass. How long does it take the planet to orbit the star?

Use Keplers law. You know at 1AU the period is 365 days...

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

  1. physics

    Astonomers discover a new planet orbiting a fixed point in space, but for reasons unknown, they can't directly observe a star where one is expected. The radius of the orbit is measured to be 1.85 x 10^8 km, and the lone planet completes …
  2. astronomy

    Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope revealed a planet about 16 AU from a star whose mass is the same as our Sun’s mass. How long does it take the planet to orbit the star?
  3. Astronomy

    Suppose that future observations with a new telescope reveal a planet about 16 AU from a star whose mass is the same size as our sun's. How long does it take the planet to orbit the star?
  4. physics

    Planets A and B orbit the same star. Planet B is four times further from the star than planet A and has twice the mass of planet A. The gravitational force of the star on planet B is ____ the force on planet A.
  5. college physics

    new planet is discovered orbiting a distant star. Observations have confirmed that the planet has a circular orbit with a radius of 21 AU and takes 118 days to orbit the star. Determine the mass of the star. State your answer with …
  6. Physics please HELP

    A planet A of mass m is in a circular orbit of radius "a" around a star ( M_star >> m ). Another planet B with the same mass m is in an elliptical orbit around the same star with its length of the semi-major axis equal to "a" …
  7. physics

    A planet A of mass m is in a circular orbit of radius "a" around a star ( M_star >> m ). Another planet B with the same mass m is in an elliptical orbit around the same star with its length of the semi-major axis equal to "a" …
  8. Ap physics 1

    The mass of a star in a galaxy far, far away, is 3.12 × 105 Earth masses, and the mean distance from the center of this star to the center of a planet with the same mass as our Earth is 2.46 × 108 km. Treating this planet and star …
  9. Physics

    The mass of a star in a galaxy far, far away, is 2.13 × 105 Earth masses, and the mean distance from the center of this star to the center of a planet with the same mass as our Earth is 7.87 × 108 km. Treating this planet and star …
  10. Physics

    Suppose that instead of our sun, our star were a giant star such as Betelgeuse. The mass of Betelgeuse is estimated to be about 20 times that of our sun. With earth in the same orbit?

More Similar Questions