A Canadian

Newest questions and responses by A Canadian
  1. Physics

    (delta)Eg = -14.7J Therefore, Ek = -(delta)Eg = 14.7J I don't understand how you'd come to the above conclusion? Does Ek just always equal -(delta)Eg?

    asked on June 21, 2013
  2. Chemistry

    Reviewing for exams and completely forgot how to do this and looking back at my notes doesn't help for this one... Can you please explain how to assign oxidation numbers for Pb(OH)4^2- I guess what's confusing me is the hydroxide... I haven't come across

    asked on June 19, 2013
  3. Chemistry

    How would you be able to recognise that C5H8 was an alkyne? And how would you know that CH3COCH3 was a ketone? (I thought it was an ether)

    asked on June 13, 2013
  4. Chemistry

    Apoarently the name of this compound is 4-ethyl-4-methylheptane: ........................CH3 ..........................| CH3-CH2-CH2-C-CH2-CH3 ..........................| .......................CH2 ..........................| .......................CH2

    asked on June 12, 2013
  5. Chemistry

    I understood this at one point and now I'm confused again! :( What's the difference between 2,2-dimethyl and 2-ethyl? It's hard to find proper drawings online... For example, for naming CH3CH2C(CH3)2CH2NH2, Why wouldn't it be 2-ethyl-1-butanamine rather

    asked on June 12, 2013
  6. Chemistry

    ................CH3 ..................| CH3-CH2-N-CH2-CH2-CH3 Hoping this turns out okay, but it's an amine and branching off of the N (on top) is a CH3. The name is N-ethyl-N-methylpropanamine but I don't get why. How do you know which ones to treat as

    asked on June 12, 2013
  7. Chemistry

    I'm having a lot of trouble with Naming organic compounds when given things like HCOOCH2CH2CH3. Can you recommend some steps? How do you identify the branches?? And would the example I have above be a carboxylic acid? My teacher said that it might help to

    asked on June 6, 2013
  8. Chemistry

    How do you draw N,N-dimethylheptanamine? The N,N part is confusing me most.

    asked on June 6, 2013
  9. Chemistry

    Name each compound. /\/\NH2 (that's suppose to be a line diagram...) I got 1-pentanamine, but that's wrong. CH3CH2-O-CHCH2CH3 .....................| ..................CH3 I'm not sure how great this will turn out, but there's supposed to be a CH3 branching

    asked on June 5, 2013
  10. Chemistry

    Explain why iron corrodes more quickly in seawater than in freshwater. I'm getting conflicting answers from searching on Google; is it because the corrosion of iron is a redox reaction, which involves a transfer of electrons, and therefore this transfer of

    asked on May 8, 2013
  11. Chemistry

    20.00mL of a 1.100E-4 mol/L Pb(NO3)2 is mixed with 80.00mL of 4.450E-2 mol/L CaI2. Will a precipitate form? Here's what I did... [Pb2+] c=n/v = (1.1E-4 mol/L x 0.02L)/(0.02L + 0.08L) = 2.2E-5 mol/L [I-] c=n/v = (4.45E-2 mol/L x 0.08L)/0.1L = 3.56E-2 mol/L

    asked on April 11, 2013
  12. Chemistry

    I need help starting this question... A buffer solution is prepared by adding 30.0g of pure acetic acid to 41.0g of sodium acetate in water, and then diluting the solution to 1.00L. What is the pH of the buffer solution?

    asked on April 11, 2013
  13. Chemistry

    Okay, I feel like this question should be really easy because it's a multiple choice question but how do you figure it out?? I'm completely drawing a blank. Consider the following equilibrium N2O4(g) 2NO2(g) Kc = 4.8E-3 Which set of concentrations

    asked on April 9, 2013
  14. Chemistry

    I'm reviewing for a test and I'm on Le Chatelier's principle. Decreasing the temperature of an exothermic reaction shifts the equilibrium to the right? I understood this weeks ago but now I can't remember. Wouldn't decreasing the temperature cause there to

    asked on April 9, 2013
  15. Chemistry

    The Ksp for nickel(II) hydroxide is 5.47E-16. What is the base dissociation constant for nickel(II) hydroxide? So I started off doing Ni(OH)2 (s) Ni2+ (aq) + 2OH- (aq) I ..........................0 .................0 C ........................+x

    asked on April 9, 2013
  16. Chemistry

    I need help starting this question: A buffer solution is prepared by adding 30.0g of pure acetic acid to 41.0g of sodium acetate in water, and then diluting the solution to 1.00L. What is the pH of the buffer solution?

    asked on April 4, 2013
  17. Chemistry

    I'm trying do this question: 0.10 mol/L hydrochloric acid is titrated with 0.10 mol/L methylamine, CH3NH2. Calculate the pH of the equivalence point. I'm having trouble with the equation... How do you know what HCl + CH3NH2 will produce? Is there a rule or

    asked on April 4, 2013
  18. Chemistry

    Ca(OH)2, CaF2, NH4NO3, KNO3, HNO3 - Arrange the solutions from most basic to most acidic. I know Ca(OH)2 will be most basic and HNO3 will be most acidic, but how do you determine for the other ones?

    asked on April 4, 2013
  19. Chemistry

    Sodium methanoate, NaHCOO, and methanoic acid, HCOOH, can be used to make a buffer solution. Explain how this combination resists changes in pH when small amounts of acid or base are added. Buffers kind of confuse me and I'm not sure how to start this. Can

    asked on April 4, 2013
  20. Chemistry

    In the equation Q = mc(deltaT), I learned that Q means heat transfer. Is it the heat transfer from the system to the surroundings, i.e. the system loses/absorbs heat or is it from the surroundings to the system? A couple of places on the Internet say that

    asked on March 4, 2013
  21. Chemistry

    Factors affecting reaction rate. Use collision theory to explain. Factor: nature of the reactant Affect on rate: more or less reactive based on its chemical identity. reactivity: aq>g>l>s Explanation: For the other factors, we had to explain it based on

    asked on March 4, 2013
  22. Chemistry

    50 mL of copper(II) sulfate reacts with 50 mL of sodium hydroxide. Their concentrations are 0.3 M and 0.6 M respectively. The temperature increased to 23.6 C from 23.4 C. Determine the enthalpy change for the reaction in kJ/mol of sodium hydroxide. Q=mcΔT

    asked on March 4, 2013
  23. Chemistry

    Can someone check my answers please? I had specific trouble with 7, 13, and 27 (I'm pretty sure my other answers are correct; some reassurance would be nice though). And I have a small question about 8. 1. The ΔHf of an element in its standard state is

    asked on March 3, 2013
  24. Chemistry

    for an assignment I'm writing, I'm trying to find the % efficiency of ethanol. We were given a chart that says ethanol's energy input (MJ/L) is 16.16 and its energy output is 23.58 % efficiency = energy output/energy input x100, so 23.57/16.16 x 100 I get

    asked on February 28, 2013
  25. English/Grammar

    There's something wrong with this sentence but I can't put my finger on it!! The federal government has put into effect a mandate that requires all gasoline in Canada to contain 5 percent ethanol.

    asked on February 28, 2013
  26. Physics

    I'm having trouble with motion graphs. How do you go from an acceleration-time graph to a velocity-time graph or displacement time graph? I know that to go from v-t to a-t I just take the slope of the v-t graph, but how do you do it the other way around?

    asked on February 27, 2013
  27. Physics

    A horse runs 15 m [N 23° E] and then 32 m [S 35° E]. What is the total displacement of the horse? I can't even visualise this... My friend told me the basic steps on how to solve it, but I got the wrong answer anyways... d1 = 15 m [N 23° E] d1x = 15m

    asked on February 26, 2013
  28. Chemistry

    Mg + 2HCl -> MgCl2 + H2 Over an interval of 1.00s, the mass of Mg changes by -0.011g What is the corresponding rate of consumption of HCl (in mol/s)? I got 9.0E-4 mol/s and that's the right answer. But I'm having problems with the next question. Calculate

    asked on February 24, 2013
  29. English

    This is a chemistry lab report, but I was wondering if someone could edit the grammar and look at the sentence structure, etc. I know it's really long and boring, but even if you just look over a bit of it, I would really appreciate it. And I'm assuming

    asked on February 21, 2013
  30. Chemistry

    I had a quiz today and one of the multiple choice questions was something like, "find the final temperature of aluminum when it is cooled" and then it gave you the specific heat capacity of aluminum, the mass of the aluminum, initial temperature, and

    asked on February 21, 2013
  31. Chemistry

    You know how when you do calculations for the enhaloy change of a reaction you start sort of like this?: NH3(aq) + HCl(aq) → NH4Cl(aq) 25 mL 25 mL 1.0 mol/L 1.0 mol/L n = c x v = 1 mol/L x 0.025L = 0.025 mol How come you only need the moles of one of the

    asked on February 21, 2013
  32. Chemistry

    Can you check my calculations, please? It's for a lab we did in order to find the the enthalpy of formation of NH4Cl(s). My final answer was -299.4 kJ, while the theoretical, or actual, value is -314.4 kJ. It was the closest value out of everyone in the

    asked on February 20, 2013
  33. Chemistry (DrBob222)

    Hi, here's my (almost) 2-paged lab report introduction (hopefully you remember it from yesterday). I went to class today, and actually a lot of my other classmates' introductions were over 2 pages! Now I'm feeling kind of insecure about mine, and I'm not

    asked on February 19, 2013
  34. Chemistry

    Firstly, is this right?: Exothermic reactions have a negative enthalpy change value because the enthalpy of the reactants are greater than the enthalpy of the products *since the reactants have weaker bonds.* (especially the starred part, I'm wondering

    asked on February 19, 2013
  35. Chemistry

    I wrote an introduction for a lab report for the first time, and I was given no samples (my teacher said "feel free to ask your friends who had chemistry last semester if you can see their introductions... none of my friends took it last semester, so I

    asked on February 19, 2013
  36. Chemistry

    Why wouldn't you do this reaction directly in a lab (and would rather use Hess' Law to determine the enthalpy of formation)?: 1/2N2(g) + 2H2(g)+ 1/2Cl2(g) -> NH4Cl(s) I don't think the reactants are that dangerous...? It's still pretty safe to do in a lab,

    asked on February 19, 2013
  37. Chemistry

    Why is the enthalpy of the reactants greater than the enthalpy of the products in an exothermic reaction? If it has something to do with the reactants having weaker bonds, why do weaker bonds have higher energy/enthalpy? It doesn't really make sense to me

    asked on February 18, 2013
  38. Chemistry

    I'm trying to write a sentence like this: Exothermic reactions have a negative enthalpy change value because the enthalpy of the reactants are greater than the enthalpy of the products since the reactants have weaker bonds.... Why do weaker bonds have

    asked on February 18, 2013
  39. Chemistry

    Is this right?: Energy is absorbed in order to break bonds because bond breaking requires energy. Or are these two statements completely separate?: "energy is absorbed when bonds break" and "breaking bonds require energy"

    asked on February 17, 2013
  40. Chemistry

    Had a recent mix-up when I re-read my chemistry notes, and trying to clear things up properly; is this right?: When bonds form, energy is released, and so the reaction absorbs energy. I have two different things written... a bond breaking results in energy

    asked on February 17, 2013
  41. Physics or math (very simple terminology question)

    "Describe the characteristics of each graph (for example, . . . ., zero or non-zero intercept value)." I guess a zero intercept value would be if the line is on the point (0,0)/the origin. But what if the line starts at (0,1) or (2,0). Because then the x

    asked on February 15, 2013
  42. Chemistry

    I did a lab today in class and part of the lab is to experimentally find the enthalpy for the dissolution of ammonium chloride by dissolving 4.0 g of NH4Cl(s) in 50.0 mL of H2O(l). I got a -5°C temperature change and calculated delta H to be 15 kJ/mol.

    asked on February 13, 2013
  43. Chemistry

    Someone said, "Calculate the total delta H of the reaction and subtract the total delta H of the product from it. If you get a positive value, it radiates heat which means it's exothermic. If it is negative, heat is needed to get a reaction so it is

    asked on February 11, 2013
  44. Chemistry

    C6H14 + 19/2 O2 -> 6 CO2 + 7H2O delta H = -4163 kJ What mass of hexane is required to produce 1.0E5 kJ of heat by complete combustion? -4163 kJ/mol x mol C6H14 = 1E5/-4163 kJ/mol Mol = 1E5/-4163 kJ/mol Mol = -24 mol I know I can do m=n x MM now, but

    asked on February 11, 2013
  45. Chemistry

    Someone said, "Calculate the total delta H of the reaction and subtract the total delta H of the product from it. If you get a positive value, it radiates heat which means it's exothermic. If it is negative, heat is needed to get a reaction so it is

    asked on February 11, 2013
  46. Chemistry

    HCl (aq) + NaOH (aq) -> NaCl (aq) + H2O (l) Will the neutralisation reaction be endothermic or exothermic? Hint: think about the net ionic equation. So, taking the hint, I got: OH- + H+ -> H2O Not sure how that helps, and now I'm stuck; how would I figure

    asked on February 11, 2013
  47. Chemistry

    Are my answers correct? C6H14 + 19/2 O2 -> 6 CO2 + 7H2O enthalpy change = -4163 kJ a) if 0.537 mol of carbon dioxide is produced in the reaction represented by the equation above, how much heat is released by the reaction? Enthalpy change = 0.537 mol CO2 x

    asked on February 11, 2013
  48. Chemistry

    2C2H2 + 5O2 -> 4CO2 + 2H2O + energy What does the equation communicate about the relative energy of the chemical bonds in the reactants and products? The intermolecular bonds of the reactants are weaker than that of the products' because the products'

    asked on February 11, 2013
  49. Chemistry

    Please help me figure out where I went wrong. HNO3 + KOH -> KNO3 + H2O enthalpy change = -53.4 kJ/mol 55.0 mL of 1.30 mol/L solutions of both reactants, at 21.4°C, are mixed in a calorimeter. What is the final temperature of the mixture? Assume the

    asked on February 10, 2013
  50. Chemistry

    I don't really understand why unit analysis works. I found a simple example on a website (I can post the link in a comment if you want). It says, For example, convert 18 grams of water to moles. The molar mass of water is 18 g/mol; therefore : 18g H2O x 1

    asked on February 8, 2013
  51. Chemistry

     4Fe + 3O2 -> 2Fe2O3 + 1.65E3 kJ  C) what is the enthalpy change for the formation of 23.6 g of iron(iii) oxide?  I'm trying to understand thermochemical reactions and stoichiometry, so could you please tell me if this is correct? And please explain the

    asked on February 7, 2013
  52. Chemistry

    25.9 kJ + 1/2 H2 + 1/2 I2 -> HI B) how much energy is needed for the reaction of 4.57E24 molecules of iodine, I2, with excess hydrogen, H2? How does the "excess" hydrogen come into play? I mean, what's the significance of having excess H2 and how do I

    asked on February 7, 2013
  53. Chemistry

    4Fe + 3O2 -> 2Fe2O3 + 1.65E3 kJ C) what is the enthalpy change for the formation of 23.6 g of iron(iii) oxide? I'm trying to understand thermochemical reactions and stoichiometry, so could you please tell me if this is correct? And please explain the parts

    asked on February 6, 2013
  54. Chemistry

    This isn't exactly a homework question, I'm just trying to understand the concept we learned today... So say we had: 4Fe + 3O2 → 2Fe2O3 + 1.65 x 10^3 kJ Does that mean for every 4 mol of Fe, 3 mol of O2, and 2 mol of Fe2O3 we have 1.65 x 10^3 kJ? And if

    asked on February 6, 2013
  55. Chemistry

    N2 + O2 -> 2NO enthalpy change = +180.6kJ c) what is the enthalpy change for the formation of one mole of nitrogen monoxide? Okay, I know this question is super easy, but I don't know how to do it; if someone could please give me a detailed explaination on

    asked on February 6, 2013
  56. Chemistry

    How come the formula for potassium peroxide is K2O2; I can't see how you'd get that...

    asked on February 6, 2013
  57. Chemistry

    Why is the formula for potassium peroxide K2O2?

    asked on February 5, 2013
  58. Math

     The height of a plant after each of the first three weeks was 7mm, 20mm, and 33mm, respectively. If this pattern of growth continues, in what week will the plant be more than 100mm tall?  The answer is 9 weeks.  This is what I did, and it's clearly

    asked on January 24, 2013
  59. Math

     The height of a plant after each of the first three weeks was 7mm, 20mm, and 33mm, respectively. If this pattern of growth continues, in what week will the plant be more than 100mm tall?  The answer is 9 weeks.  This is what I did, and it's clearly

    asked on January 24, 2013
  60. Math

    In a lab experiment, the count of a bacteria doubles every hour. a)at 1pm, there was 23000 bacteria. How many bacteria will be present at midnight? I can't seem to get the correct answer. The answer is 47 104 000 bacteria. Thanks very much in advance!

    asked on January 24, 2013
  61. Math

    The height of a plant after each of the first three weeks was 7mm, 20mm, and 33mm, respectively. If this pattern of growth continues, in what week will the plant be more than 100mm tall? The answer is 9 weeks. This is what I did, and it's clearly wrong: tn

    asked on January 23, 2013
  1. Chemistry

    Sorry, I keep thinking of more stuff... Complications always magically arise right before an evaluation and never while I can actually ask my teacher :( Can there be more than three in a branch? So far we've only done ones with methyl, ethyl, and propyl,

    posted on June 12, 2013
  2. Chemistry

    Also, if there's branches coming off of it, what do you do? For example, if the left part had a branch: CH3 ...| CH3-CH2-N Or would that just be extending the branch? And it would make the "N-ethyl" into "N-propyl"?

    posted on June 12, 2013
  3. Chemistry

    And how would you know if there's double bonds?

    posted on June 6, 2013
  4. Chemistry

    No, sorry, it'd be an ester right?

    posted on June 6, 2013
  5. Chemistry

    And how would you know something was a cyclic hydrocarbon when given something like CH3CH2COOH? (I know that one isn't a cyclic hydrocarbon but I mean like when you get questions saying "name the organic compound" and they give stuff like CH3CH2COOH and

    posted on June 6, 2013
  6. Chemistry

    ..........CH3...................................CH3 ............|..........................................| CH3 -- C -- C =(triple bond)= C -- C -- CH3 ............|..........................................|

    posted on June 5, 2013
  7. Chemistry

    I forgot to write ^2 on the [I-] for Qsp. Just a typo though, I did square it when I punched it in my calculator.

    posted on April 11, 2013
  8. Chemistry

    Oh, are the other three salts? And you just have to see whether they're acidic or basic or neutral salts? I got that KNO3 was neutral, CaF2 was basic and NH4NO3 was acidic? So.. Ca(OH)2, CaF2, KNO3, NH4NO3, HNO3? Is there another way I should be doing this

    posted on April 4, 2013
  9. Chemistry

    Oh okay so they have two distinct jobs, but they're still together in the solution? For example in a lab or something, both chemicals would be mixed inside one beaker? Is this explanation right?: If an acid is added, the H3O+ ions will be removed by

    posted on April 4, 2013
  10. Chemistry

    The example problem I gave is the root of all my confusion... Before, I always though when you do Q=mc(deltaT), you're getting the amount of heat absorbed/released by the SURROUNDINGS, and so when you want to get deltaH, you'd have to make Q negative in

    posted on March 4, 2013
  11. English/Grammar

    and if another "that" was added then "to" would change to "must", I guess?

    posted on February 28, 2013
  12. English/Grammar

    Maybe another "that" after "requires"?? The "...that ____ that..." bothers me though. Too many 'that's!

    posted on February 28, 2013
  13. English

    If it is feedback on only a small portion of it which could be read quickly, then thank you, but it did not come off that way.

    posted on February 22, 2013
  14. Grammar

    (which is why I put it under English this time, rather than chemistry)

    posted on February 22, 2013
  15. English

    I don't mean to sound rude, but you couldn't have read that all in less than a minute and so you couldn't have truly come to that conclusion. Please don't give false feedback.

    posted on February 22, 2013
  16. Grammar

    I actually already got one to read it and he said, "I see nothing 'wrong'." so I guess nothing "wrong" with quotes would mean there are some technical issues or something, I don't know. but this time around I was loOking more for a grammar check, but I can

    posted on February 22, 2013
  17. Grammar

    That's alright, thanks though.

    posted on February 21, 2013
  18. Grammar

    Hi Writeacher, I was wondering if you could take a look at my question jiskha(dot)com/display.cgi?id=1361488610 I don't know if you already have and decided not to answer it (never mind if you already did look at it), it's just that I've seen you edit some

    posted on February 21, 2013
  19. Chemistry

    Thanks; I obviously got it wrong, but what was my teacher talking about when she said that when you have a solid reacting, you don't use the mass of the solid for Q=mc(deltaT), only the mass of liquids or solutions? Why wouldn't that apply in this case?

    posted on February 21, 2013
  20. Chemistry

    That's what I don't really understand. If it's of the total reaction, shouldn't you add, in my example, the moles of both reactants? i.e. 0.025 +0.025 = 0.05 mol. Then use that value when doing deltaH = -Q/n? How come you only use The moles of one?

    posted on February 21, 2013
  21. Chemistry

    So if you find the enthalpy change for one reactant, it's the enthalpy change for the other reactant (and products??), i.e. you know the enthalpy change for the entire reaction? So enthalpy change of one reactant (or product also?) = enthalpy change of

    posted on February 21, 2013
  22. Chemistry

    Oh, oops ! I forgot to put x100 and then the rest of my answer, 4.8% (or 5%) I think it's a small miracle that I didn't make any mistakes when calculating the enthalpy of formation, there were a ton of steps! Thank you so much!

    posted on February 21, 2013
  23. Chemistry (DrBob222)

    Oh no! :( I tried to sum up the stuff as best as I could and be brief since I felt that two pages was way too long, but now I feel like I shouldn't have done that... I'll ask her tomorrow how much detail she expects, etc. because I don't really think mine

    posted on February 19, 2013
  24. Chemistry

    I thought it might be kind of obnoxious of me to just post two pages worth of stuff and ask someone to read it, but thank you so much for being willing to look at it, I'll definitely repost tomorrow! Thanks for answering, and good night!

    posted on February 19, 2013
  25. Chemistry

    But that would happen AFTER a reaction... Why would a reaction end up being expthermic if, originally, the enthalpy of the reactants are greater than the enthalpy of the products. And also, why do weaker bonds have more enthalpy/energy?

    posted on February 18, 2013
  26. Chemistry

    I'm basically trying to explain why, in exothermic reactions, enthalpy of the products are greater than the enthalpy of the reactants (resulting in a negative enthalpy change). And I obviously don't know myself. Can someone please explain? I can't seem to

    posted on February 18, 2013
  27. Chemistry

    It's just that I have to include both ideas together in a paragraph and I writing, "Energy is required to break a bond. Breaking a bond requires energy." doesn't have "flow" and would work better in one sentence.

    posted on February 17, 2013
  28. Chemistry

    Basically, ignore the rest of my question if the above sentence is okay.

    posted on February 17, 2013
  29. Chemistry

    Sorry, I think this sentence should be alright, "Energy is required to break bonds, and when the bonds break, energy is absorbed." Don't know why I had to go through all that trouble to reach this simple sentence, but...

    posted on February 17, 2013
  30. Chemistry

    This question came up because I'm trying to write for the introduction in my lab report, "Energy is required to break bonds, so when bonds break, energy is absorbed". But that sounded off (because that's like saying the absorption of energy when bonds

    posted on February 17, 2013
  31. Chemistry

    i.e. is energy absorption a result of breaking bonds, or is energy absorbed in order to break bonds? So like... Energy is required to break bonds. Energy is somehow obtained, the bonds break... and this results in the absorption of *different* energy

    posted on February 17, 2013
  32. Chemistry

    So for the neutralisation one I'm way off, right? Is it unacceptably off? Because my teacher said we'd have tomorrow to continue if we didn't finish, so I might just do that part again. That makes more sense, thanks so much for answering (for all the other

    posted on February 13, 2013
  33. Chemistry

    Sorry, how would you solve for mols? I feel like this should be obvious, but ...

    posted on February 11, 2013
  34. Chemistry

    If you absolutely had to improve it what would you improve? Anything that sticks out especially to you But thank you; haha, I wouldn't go after an American prize anyways!

    posted on February 11, 2013
  35. Chemistry

    I checked it over for what feels like the tenth time and I see that I should've converted the 3.82 kJ to 3820 J; I ended up with the correct answer using that. But I feel like my method was a bit over-complicated. Is there a simpler method that I'm just

    posted on February 11, 2013
  36. Chemistry

    I just realised I made the stupidest mistake ever. I guess this is what happens when you try to do chemistry while sick. The last bit of math doesn't make sense; it should be 3.82 = (460.24)(Tf-21.4°C) 3.82 = Tf460.24 - 9849.136 -Tf460.24 = -9849.136 -

    posted on February 11, 2013
  37. Chemistry

    , but then would 1mol/18g H2O mean 1 mol per 18 grams per mol of H2O..? There's one mol for every 18g of H2O..? It's confusing

    posted on February 8, 2013
  38. Chemistry

    But I don't think division would mean "which" weighs 18g..

    posted on February 8, 2013
  39. Chemistry

    I'm really sorry, but I still don't really understand - what do you mean by "figure out what part of two moles you had "?

    posted on February 6, 2013