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Kate Chopin¡¦s stories are essentially about the struggle of freedom

Kate Chopin was one of the most individual and adventurous nineteenth century American writers. Throughout Kate Chopin¡¦s stories, she gave the readers a woman¡¦s view of how repressive and confining marriage can be for a woman, both spiritually and sexually through images of entrapment and freedom. From her stories, we not only learn how she illustrates that the nineteenth century was a difficult time for many women because of the domination of white men over them, but we also learn how her social life can be reflected on her stories. Kate Chopin clearly develops the ideas of freedom and entrapment in one of her masterpieces, "The Storm."

¡§The Storm,¡¨ by Kate Chopin, is a short story about two people who have an affair during a storm. The story involves two families, that of Bobinot, Calixta, and Bibi, and Alcee, Clarisse, and their babies. Calixta is at her house separated from her family because of the storm. Alcee is separated from his family because they are visiting another town. The storm brings Calixta and Alcee together, and they have an affair. A storm can mean many things, both good and bad, and it is important to the story both symbolically and directly.

Kate Chopin uses several techniques to create the images of how freedom and entrapment affect Calixta and Alcee. With the opening section of the story, Bobinot already traps Calixta: ¡§Mama¡¦ll be ¡¥fraid, yes,¡¨ Bibi suggests. Bobinot in respond says, ¡§She¡¦ll shut the house¡K¡¨ By this sentence, the readers can obtain an initial idea of how the relationship between the two characters is. Bobinot did not care about the storm, which represents the marriage. Whereas, Bibi, show a great deal of braveness by laying ¡§his little hand on his father¡¦s knee and was not afraid.¡¨. Chopin often uses the image of the shut of houses or doors to illustrate the idea of entrapment, in this case, shutting of the house. Secondly, in section two, it is filled with images of entrapment in their marriage: ¡§She sat at a side window sewing furiously on a sewing machine.¡¨ This describes how long she has been unwillingly with this marriage. Chopin uses the word ¡§furiously¡¨ to indicate the marriage is not going well for Calixta and she endured this marriage no longer. This word creates a tense atmosphere, which helps to develop the image of entrapment in this marriage. In addition, she is sitting next to a window. Does this suggest she is seeking for freedom?
¡§It began to grow dark, and suddenly realizing the situation she got up hurriedly and went about closing windows and doors.¡¨ Once more, the writer uses special words such as ¡¥dark¡¦ and ¡¥closing window and doors¡¦ to emphasize the effect of entrapment. Calixta is already entrapped in the dark house (marriage) but when the storm comes, the image shows even more entrapment appearances by the closing of the windows and doors. ¡§and he went inside, closing the door after him. It was even necessary to put something beneath the door to keep the water out.¡¨ Chopin does not only show Calixta is innocent and been entrapped but also Alcee. The writer uses her most common technique, using words such as ¡§inside¡¨, ¡§closing the door¡¨. However, this time, she pushes it even further in the second sentence. ¡§It was even necessary¡¨ this develops stronger and more entrapped environments. ¡§The house is too low to be struck, with so many tall trees standing about¡¨ This demonstrates they are trapped in this house (marriage) surrounded by many trees, which is impossible to break through.

To build up the tension the writer constantly fills the story with imagery of entrapment but after the storm has passed, the reader would find that the fear is gone and is replaced by desire (freedom). ¡§The rain was over; and the sun was turning the glistening green world into a palace of gems. Calixta, on the gallery, watched Alcee ride away. He turned and smiled at her with a beaming face; and she lifted her pretty chin in the air and laughed aloud¡¨. After the storm has passed and they have had an affair, clearly they have been set free from the marriage with the image of the sun turning glistening green world into a palace of gems symbolizing a new life and hope. They are so happy that they have cheated, Alcee turned and smiled at her with a beaming face instead of feeling guilty. In addition, Calixta laughed aloud. They find an affair can bring them freedom. Moreover, the reader also finds the storm can be very important as symbolically and emblematically. ¡§they laughed much and so loud that anyone might have heard them as far away as Laballiere¡¦s.¡¨ over again the writer emphasises Calixta is free from the entrapment of this marriage, where it shows as opposed to being infuriated with her son and husband, she is pleased they are back. ¡§Alcee Laballiere wrote to his wife, Clarisse, that night¡K He was getting on nicely¡K¡¨ As Alcee is getting his freedom, he is more than happy that Clarisse stay a month longer.

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asked by Baby
  1. Kate Chopin was one of the most individual and adventurous nineteenth century American writers. Throughout Kate Chopin's stories, she gave the readers a woman's view of how repressive and confining marriage can be for a woman, both spiritually and sexually<~~add comma through images of entrapment and freedom. From her stories, we not only learn how she illustrates that the nineteenth century was a difficult time for many women because of the domination of white men over them, but we also learn how her social life is reflected in her stories. Kate Chopin clearly develops the ideas of freedom and entrapment in one of her masterpieces, "The Storm."

    "The Storm," by Kate Chopin, is a short story about two people who have an affair during a storm. The story involves two families, that of Bobinot, Calixta, and Bibi, and Alcee, Clarisse, and their babies.<~~that's very confusing; try using a colon after "families" and a semicolon between the two sets of family members Calixta is at her house separated from her family because of the storm. Alcee is separated from his family because they are visiting another town. The storm brings Calixta and Alcee together, and they have an affair. A storm can mean many things, both good and bad, and it is important to the story both symbolically and directly. I still think you're misuing the term "affair."

    Your third paragraph is much better developed than it was previously. This sentence needs help, though:
    "Chopin does not only show Calixta is innocent and been entrapped but also Alcee." Try this~~> Chopin shows that both Calixta and Alcee have been entrapped.

    The fourth paragraph needs work. This sentence -- "To build up the tension the writer constantly fills the story with imagery of entrapment but after the storm has passed, the reader would find that the fear is gone and is replaced by desire (freedom)." -- is very clumsy. Try this ~~> To build the tension, Chopin constantly fills the story with imagery of entrapment; however, after the storm has passed, the reader finds that fear is gone, replaced by freedom.

    Be sure to set the paper aside for a day or two (or as long as you can), and then read it aloud to someone (or to yourself in front of a mirror, perhaps. As you read, you'll find places where you stumble and have to re-read. THOSE ARE THE PLACES THAT NEED REWORDING. If you who wrote the paper stumbles, you can bet that any readers of your paper will have a rough time, too!

  2. Million Thanks for reading it over and over it again.

    I will upload my final draft later on.

    By the way this is marked at Britain GCSE standard, what would you give this writing so far? (out of A*, A, B, C, D)

    thank you again!

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    posted by Baby
  3. Kate Chopin was one of the most individual and adventurous nineteenth-century American writers. Throughout Kate Chopin¡¦s (WHAT IS HAPPENING THAT YOU ARE GETTING THESE INAPPROPRIATE SYMBOLS WITHIN YOUR TEXT?) stories, she gave the readers a woman¡¦s view of how repressive and confining marriage can be for a woman, both spiritually and sexually through images of entrapment and freedom. From her stories, we not only learn how she illustrates that the nineteenth century was a difficult time for many women because of the domination of white men over them, but we also learn how her social life can be reflected on ("BY") her stories. Kate Chopin clearly develops the ideas of freedom and entrapment in one of her masterpieces, "The Storm."

    ¡§The Storm,¡¨ by Kate Chopin, is a short story about two people who have an affair during a storm. The story involves two families, that ("ONE WITH"?) of Bobinot, Calixta, and ("THE OTHER WITH"?) Bibi, and Alcee, Clarisse, and their babies. Calixta is at her house separated from her family because of the storm. Alcee is separated from his family (COMMMA) because they are visiting another town. The storm brings Calixta and Alcee together, and they have an affair. A storm can mean many things, both good and bad, and it is important to the story both symbolically and directly. (IF IT IS SO IMPORTANT, WHAT DO YOU THINK IT MEANS?)

    Kate Chopin uses several techniques to create the images of how freedom and entrapment affect Calixta and Alcee. With the opening section of the story, Bobinot already traps Calixta: ¡§Mama¡¦ll be ¡¥fraid, yes,¡¨ Bibi suggests. Bobinot in respond says, ¡§She¡¦ll shut the house¡K¡¨ By this sentence, the readers can obtain an initial idea of how the relationship between the two characters is. (THIS MAY GIVE YOU AN IDEA OF THE RELATIONSHIP, BUT — WITHOUT FURTHER KNOWLEDGE — IT DOES NOT DO THIS FOR THIS READER.) Bobinot did not care about the storm, which represents the marriage. Whereas, Bibi, show a great deal of braveness by laying ¡§his little hand on his father¡¦s knee and was not afraid.¡¨. Chopin often uses the image of the shut("-TING"?) of houses or doors to illustrate the idea of entrapment, in this case, shutting of the house. Secondly, in section two, it is filled with images of entrapment in their marriage: ¡§She sat at a side window sewing furiously on a sewing machine.¡¨ This describes how long she has been unwillingly (WHAT?) with this marriage. Chopin uses the word ¡§furiously¡¨ to indicate the marriage is not going well for Calixta (COMMA) and she endured this marriage no longer. This word creates a tense atmosphere, which helps to develop the image of entrapment in this marriage. In addition, she is sitting next to a window. Does this suggest she is seeking for freedom? (DOES IT?)
    ¡§It began to grow dark, and suddenly realizing the situation (COMMA) she got up hurriedly and went about closing windows and doors.¡¨ Once more, the writer uses special words such as ¡¥dark¡¦ and ¡¥closing window and doors¡¦ to emphasize the effect of entrapment. Calixta is already entrapped in the dark house (marriage)(COMMA) but when the storm comes, the image shows even more entrapment appearances by the closing of the windows and doors. ¡§and he went inside, closing the door after him. It was even necessary to put something beneath the door to keep the water out.¡¨ Chopin does not only show ("THAT") Calixta is innocent and ("HAD") been entrapped but also Alcee. The writer uses her most common technique, using words such as ¡§inside¡¨, ¡§closing the door¡¨. However, this time, she pushes it even further in the second sentence. ¡§It was even necessary¡¨ this develops stronger and more entrapped environments. ¡§The house is too low to be struck, with so many tall trees standing about¡¨ This demonstrates they are trapped in this house (marriage) surrounded by many trees, which is impossible to break through.

    To build up the tension the writer constantly fills the story with imagery of entrapment but after the storm has passed, the reader would find that the fear is gone and is replaced by desire (freedom). ¡§The rain was over; and the sun was turning the glistening green world into a palace of gems. Calixta, on the gallery, watched Alcee ride away. He turned and smiled at her with a beaming face; and she lifted her pretty chin in the air and laughed aloud¡¨. After the storm has passed and they have had an affair, clearly they have been set free from the marriage with the image of the sun turning glistening green world into a palace of gems symbolizing a new life and hope. They are so happy that they have cheated, Alcee turned and smiled at her with a beaming face instead of feeling guilty. In addition, Calixta laughed aloud. They find an affair can bring them freedom. Moreover, the reader also finds the storm can be very important as symbolically and emblematically. ¡§they laughed much and so loud that anyone might have heard them as far away as Laballiere¡¦s.¡¨ over again the writer emphasises Calixta is free from the entrapment of this marriage, where it shows as opposed to being infuriated with her son and husband, she is pleased they are back. ¡§Alcee Laballiere wrote to his wife, Clarisse, that night¡K He was getting on nicely¡K¡¨ As Alcee is getting his freedom, he is more than happy that Clarisse stay a month longer.

    WITH ALL THE EXTRANEOUS SYMBOLS, YOUR ESSAY IS VERY HARD TO READ. I GOT SO FRUSTRATED, I DID NOT READ THE ESSAY COMPLETELY.

    YOU SEEM TO MAKE THE ASSUMPTION THAT THE READER OF THIS ESSAY KNOWS AS MUCH ABOUT THE CHARACTERS AS YOU DO. THEIR RELATIONSHIPS NEED TO BE INDICATED MORE CLEARLY. BEFORE YOU SUBMIT ANOTHER ESSAY TO US, DO YOUR OWN PROOFREADING.

    In the future, if nobody is available to proofread your work, you can do this yourself. After writing your material, put it aside for a day — at least several hours. (This breaks mental sets you might have that keep you from noticing problems.) Then read it aloud as if you were reading someone else's work. (Reading aloud slows down your reading, so you are less likely to skip over problems.)

    If your reading goes smoothly, that is fine. However, wherever you "stumble" in your reading, other persons are likely to have a problem in reading your material. Those "stumbles" indicate areas that need revising.

    Once you have made your revisions, repeat the process above. Good papers often require many drafts.

    I hope this helps. Thanks for asking.

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    posted by PsyDAG
  4. utleect

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