Parsing Nouns

Can anyone explain this in simple terms... ?

See we are parsing nouns and we have sentences like this:

Lindsay's guests from Barrie had arrived by train.

For each noun we need to give the class, the gender, the person, the number, the case and its relationship. I'm having trouble with the case and realationship.

See the case for the noun "Barrie" is objective and objective of the preposition "of".

I don't understand why... or how to tell the difference between nominative cases or objective cases. Not to mention subject completion or things like direct and indirect objects.

Can anyone make this more simple?

Thank you!!!


The nominative case is used as a subject of a verb. Examples of nominative cases are underlined.
Joe lives two blocks away.
He is an anthropology major.

The objective case is used as the object of a verb or a preposition. Examples of a noun used as the object of a verb are in italics.
Joe gave Sue a tour of his spectacular home.
We painted the walls in our house.

Examples of a noun used as the object of a preposition are in italics; the prepostion is boldfaced.
Lindsay's guests from Barrie had arrived by train.

Check these sites for more information.

http://www.ucalgary.ca/UofC/eduweb/grammar/course/sentence/2_2c.htm

http://www.ucalgary.ca/UofC/eduweb/grammar/course/sentence/2_2d.htm

http://eslus.com/LESSONS/GRAMMAR/POS/pos7.htm




Can anyone explain this in simple terms... ?

See we are parsing nouns and we have sentences like this:

Lindsay's guests from Barrie had arrived by train.

For each noun we need to give the class, the gender, the person, the number, the case and its relationship. I'm having trouble with the case and realationship.

See the case for the noun "Barrie" is objective and objective of the preposition "of".

I don't understand why... or how to tell the difference between nominative cases or objective cases. Not to mention subject completion or things like direct and indirect objects.

Can anyone make this more simple?



Ms. Sue has given you excellent information and really good websites.

Another way to think of nouns is this:

Nouns generally have four forms:
singular
(boy)
plural (boys)
singular possessive (boy's)
plural possessive (boys')

The singular and plural forms have cases, as Ms. Sue explained:
nominative -- for subjects or subject complements
objective -- for direct objects, indirect objects, objects of prepositions, etc.

The possessive forms are used similarly to adjectives; that is, they describe or modify another noun:
The boy's red jacket is missing. (singular possessive, modifying "jacket")
All those boys' science books are alike.
(plural possessive, modifying "books")

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/nouns.htm

=)

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