calculus

Evaluate the integral ∫∫∫2xzdV bounded by Q. Where Q is the region enclosed by the planes
x + y + z = 4, y = 3x, x = 0, and z = 0.
Answer=16/15

Is this answer correct? cause i've tried doing this problem a bunch of ways and i never even get close to 16/15. i think the correct answer should be -20992/15. i know that's nice a prettier or cleaner answer but i honestly have know idea how my professor got 16/15. help if the answer really is 16/15.

asked by Brandon
  1. mk, i graphed the bounded region and saw my mistake. but i got 17/15 for my answer instead. so did my professor still do it wrong? or did i miss some small detail?

    posted by Brandon

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