Physics

My last problem for the day:
A) The centers of two 11.00 kg spheres are separated by 0.09 m. What is their gravitational attraction?

I got 9.96 x 10^-7 N.

B) What is the ratio of this attraction to the weight of one of the spheres (at the surface of the Earth)?

I'm sure this is probably really easy, but we haven't covered ratios in my class yet, and I don't have my book with me. Can I please get some help?

  1. 👍 0
  2. 👎 0
  3. 👁 77
  1. A)(6.67*10^-11)*(11)^2/(0.09)^2
    = 9.97*10^-7 N You are correct
    B) To get a ratio, you just divide one number by the other. The other number is M g = 107.8 N

    The ratio of x to y is x/y, by definition. So in your case, the ratio is 9.97*10^-7/107.8 = ?
    It's roughly 10^-8

    1. 👍 0
    2. 👎 0
    posted by drwls
  2. Great I got it, thanks for all your help.

    1. 👍 0
    2. 👎 0
    posted by Lindsay

Respond to this Question

First Name

Your Response

Similar Questions

  1. physics-Gravitational Attraction(please help)

    1. The centers of two 11.80 kg spheres are separated by 0.09 m. What is their gravitational attraction? 2. What is the ratio of this attraction to the weight of one of the spheres (at the surface of the Earth)? Please answer both

    asked by Amanda on November 9, 2013
  2. physics

    A solid lead sphere of radius 10 m (about 66 ft across!) has a mass of about 57 million kg. If two of these spheres are floating in deep space with their centers 20 m apart, the gravitational attraction between the spheres is only

    asked by anonymous on March 11, 2014
  3. Physics

    Lead spheres of masses 1.7 kg and 20.4 g whose centers are separated by 6.1 cm. Calculate the gravitational force between these spheres, treating each as a point mass located at the center of the sphere. The value of the universal

    asked by George on February 9, 2016
  4. physics

    Gravitational Attraction 1. The centers of two 11.80 kg spheres are separated by 0.09 m. What is their gravitational attraction? 2. What is the ratio of this attraction to the weight of one of the spheres (at the surface of the

    asked by Amanda on November 9, 2013
  5. Physics

    Consider three identical metal spheres, A, B, and C. Sphere A carries a charge of -8q. Sphere B carries a charge of +7q. Sphere C carries no net charge. Spheres A and B are touched together and then separated. Sphere C is then

    asked by Mary on August 28, 2007
  6. Physics

    In introductory physics laboratories, a typical Cavendish balance for measuring the gravitational constant G uses lead spheres of masses 1.27 kg and 18.4 g whose centers are separated by 5.05 cm. Calculate the gravitational force

    asked by Jesus on December 12, 2011
  7. physics

    In introductory physics laboratories, a typical Cavendish balance for measuring the gravitational constant G uses lead spheres of masses 1.79 kg and 16.9 g whose centers are separated by 5.49 cm. Calculate the gravitational force

    asked by tanya on December 10, 2011
  8. PHY

    . Four identical metal spheres have charges of qA = –8.0 µC, qB =–2.0 µC, qC = +5.0µ C, and qD = +12.0µ C. (a) Two of the spheres are brought together so they touch, and then they are separated. Which spheres are they, if

    asked by Saif on February 17, 2013
  9. Phy 231

    A baton consists of a nearly massless rod of length L and two spheres attached to the end of the rod, whose masses are each M and whose centers are separated by L. The spheres have radius R. If the sphere radius R is not

    asked by Sally on July 31, 2012
  10. Physics - charge on sphere

    Two 2.0g spheres are attached to each end of a silk thread 1.20m long. The spheres are given identical charges and the midpoint of the thread is then suspended from a point on the ceiling. The spheres come to rest in equilibrium,

    asked by Anonymous on October 18, 2010

More Similar Questions