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Are these sentences using the adjective and adverb correctly? Do they make sense?

1) The girl is a "bad" softball player.(Adjective)

2) The girl played softball "badly." (Adverb)

1) I am "cautious" when I run at night. (Adjective)

2) I "cautiously" run at night. (Adverb)

1) I am "hopeful" that we will receive our bonus. (Adjective)

2) "Hopefully," we will receive our bonus. (Adverb)

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  1. Great!

    Some grammar purists argue that your use of "hopefully" is not correct. Check this site for the details.

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hopefully

  2. yes, correct. I would have used "poor" and "Poorly" instead of bad, due to recent connotations of the word "bad."

    In the vernacular, "bad" can have some weird implications.

  3. Thank you!

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