Physics

The velocity of the transverse waves produced
by an earthquake is 5.08 km/s, while that of
the longitudinal waves is 8.3312 km/s. A seismograph records the arrival of the transverse
waves 55.9 s after that of the longitudinal
waves.
How far away was the earthquake?
Answer in units of km.

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  2. 👎 1
  3. 👁 180
asked by Laura
  1. Require that
    T(delay) = 55.9 s = D/5.08 - D/8.3312
    = 0.07682 D
    D = 727.7 km

    1. 👍 0
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    posted by drwls
  2. 800

    1. 👍 0
    2. 👎 0
    posted by sd

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