English

1. He stopped smoking.
(Does it mean that he stopped smoking forever or does it mean he stopped smoking for the time being?)

2. He quit/quitted smoking.
(What about this one? Is it the same as #1? Do we have to use 'quit' or 'quitted'?)

3. He awoke to find himself famous.
= He awoke and found himself
famous.

3-1. He woke up to find himself famous.
= He woke up and found himself
famous.

4. He lived to be eighty-eight years
old.
= He lived till he was eighty-eight
years old.

(Are they all grammatical?)

5. To do his best, he could not succed in the business.
= Though he did his best, he could not succeed in the business.

6. It is difficult to solve this math
problem.
= This math proble is difficult to
solve.

7. I should be glad to go with you.
= I should be glad if I could go with you.

8. I would be glad to go with you.
= I would be glad if I went with you.
= I would be glad if I could go with you.

(Are they all correct and interchangable? Does each pair have the same meaning?)

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asked by John
  1. 1. He stopped smoking.
    (Does it mean that he stopped smoking forever or does it mean he stopped smoking for the time being?) The use of the simple past tense "stopped" indicates that he stopped in the past and hasn't resumed the practice.

    2. He quit/quitted smoking.
    (What about this one? Is it the same as #1? Do we have to use 'quit' or 'quitted'?) "quit" is correct; this is one of those irregular verbs whose principal parts do not change, just like "cut" and "cost" and others.

    3. He awoke to find himself famous.
    = He awoke and found himself
    famous. yes

    3-1. He woke up to find himself famous.
    = He woke up and found himself
    famous. yes

    4. He lived to be eighty-eight years
    old.
    = He lived till he was eighty-eight
    years old. yes, but it would be better to use "until" rather than "till" which has other meanings.

    (Are they all grammatical?)

    5. To do his best, he could not succed in the business.
    = Though he did his best, he could not succeed in the business. The second sentence is better; it's not exactly the same as the first.

    6. It is difficult to solve this math
    problem.
    = This math proble is difficult to
    solve. yes; watch spelling - "problem"

    7. I should be glad to go with you.
    = I should be glad if I could go with you. yes

    8. I would be glad to go with you.
    = I would be glad if I went with you.
    = I would be glad if I could go with you. yes, either one

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  2. #2 = He quit smoking. Both 1 and 2 mean the same but you do not know if he stopped temporarily or permanently.

    #4 = till could be 'til

    #5 is not good. You might say "Although he did his best,......"

    #6 Check the spelling of "problem" in the 2nd sentence.

    The rest are OK.

    Sra

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  3. #1. That usually means that he has stopped smoking totally.

    2. quit... and yes it means the same.

    3(1) is the better.

    4. is correct.

    5. The second one is correct.

    6. Both are correct

    7. We do not use this.

    8.. All of these are good.

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