Physical Science

If you know the rate of movement along a fault, the amount of offset over a period of time can be calculated. The basic relationship is
Rate = distance/time
Movement along the San Andreas Fault is about 3.5 cm/yr.

If a fence were built across the fault in 2005, how far apart will the two sections of the now-broken fence be in 2030?

asked by Hannah
  1. Was the fence built Jan 1, 2005 or December 31, 2005? I'll assume Jan 1, 2005
    distance = rate x time
    d = 3.5 cm/yr x #years.
    Plug in the # years between the time the fence was built and 2030 and solve for distance in cm. Approximately 90 cm if I plug in 26 years.

    posted by DrBob222

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