ict - ms sue

ms sue sorry to ask again but does definition of groups mean a disscussion group eg:- facebook
thanks

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asked by lisa
  1. A Google search shows that an internet group can be almost anything. It could be a conglomeration of businesses dealing with the internet; it could be a discussion group like Facebook; I think we could call the Jiskha Homework Help Forum an internet group.

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    posted by Ms. Sue

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