Chemistry

I: The standard reaction free energy at
equilibrium is zero.
II: A reaction stops when the equilibrium is reached.
III: An equilibrium reaction is not affected by increasing the concentrations of products.
Which of these statements is/are true?

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asked by Susan
  1. II is not true, ever.
    III is not true most times
    I is always true

  2. that answer is not correct

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    posted by Susan
  3. Which answer is wrong?

  4. I plugged in the anwser and it was wrong. I tried putting in 1 and 1 and 3

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    posted by Susan
  5. these are the choices

    1. Only I and III are true.
    2. I, II, and III are true.
    3. Only II is true.
    4. Only III is true.
    5. Only I and II are true.
    6. None is true.
    7. Only II and III are true.
    8. Only I is true.

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    posted by Susan
  6. I agree with all of the answers given by Bob Pursley.
    The correct choice from your list is #8. You haven't entered the correct choice; i.e., 8.

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    posted by DrBob222
  7. 8,5, and 1 are wrong

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    posted by Susan
  8. or 4

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    posted by Susan
  9. i Figured it out. The answer is none

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    posted by Susan

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