Posts by Writeacher

Total # Posts: 46,611

Health
You're welcome.

Health
I agree.

History
Read lots and let us know what you decide: https://www.google.com/search?q=sadat+egypt+israel+relationship&oq=sadat+egypt+israel+relationship&aqs=chrome..69i57.10890j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

English
https://www.google.com/search?q=whitman+and+emerson+transcendentalism&oq=whitman+emerson+transcen&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j69i61j0l2.8370j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 Read through several of these search results and let us know what you decide.

English
In that sentence, "the star" seems to be referring to a particular star, one that has already been named in an earlier sentence. It depends on context, remember. Just after having looked at the sky at night over many decades, yes, I agree that some look brighter than...

English
1 is fine, although I'd use "at" or "in" instead of "of." 2 is implying that there is only one student in the school, yes. And again, I'd use "at" ... 3 is stating that he is the only student in the school!

English
Yes, your analyses are fine.

English
Here is an example of ambiguous wording when the Oxford comma was left out: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/16/us/oxford-comma-lawsuit.html Lots of money involved!!

English
Reed is correct. You should use the Oxford comma every time — that is, put in a comma before ‘and’ every time. Having it there avoids misinterpretation.

English
Again, these uses of "the straw" are referring to a particular straw.

English
All are referring to one particular orange in that container of water, yes.

biology
Kat is right. Go to http://www.google.com Type in define pseudopodia Press Enter Read, read, read

History
Are you getting ready to research and write a book? Read lots and take notes. https://www.google.com/search?q=effects+on+navajos+by+spanish+and+americans&oq=effects+on+navajos+by+spanish+and+americans&aqs=chrome..69i57.16344j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 https://www.google.com/...

Social studies
If you post the specific questions you are having difficulty with, AND let us know what YOUR question about the assignment is, someone here can help you. No one, however, will do your work for you, but a tutor will check your work once you post what YOU THINK.

Geography
https://www.google.com/search?q=singapore%27s+government+after+independence&oq=singapore%27s+government+after+independence&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i61.8575j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 Read lots to determine YOUR OWN answer.

History
"to side with others" What does that even mean? If you are answering this question for your own classwork, you should be more specific.

English
I'd say 1, 2, and 3 mean the same thing, yes. These sentences mean that both people love you equally (although I don't know how one can measure love!).

English
What poem?

History
Read lots!! https://www.google.com/search?q=sailing+inventions+age+of+exploration&oq=sailing+inventions+age+of+exploration&aqs=chrome..69i57.10692j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

History
And you think ... ?

English
Either one is understandable, but the second set is grammatically correct since you're introducing three people, not just one.

History
And you think it's ... ?

English
1. They are the students of our school. 2. They are all the students of our school. [Is #1 the same as #2?] Yes. However, I'd use "at" instead of "of" in these sentences. 3. They are students of our school. 4. They are some of the students of our school...

English
All can be generic, but #2 can also refer to a particular dog. It all depends on the context of the sentence -- that is, the sentences around it.

English
You’re welcome!

English
These sentences would be better if they were active instead of passive! 1 and 3 seem generic to me, but 2 seems to be referring to a particular animal.

English
You, too, Marylyn!! Good luck with this one!

English
I take “client” to be the direct obj and the infinitive phrase to serve as an adj, modifying “client.”

English
... turned into a prepositional phrase ...

English
The other thing I keep tripping over is that with the other verbs, the indirect object can be turned into a prephrase, and it’ll be smooth phrasing. Bring me the book. (IO) Bring the book to me. (obj of prep) Tell me a story. Tell a story to me. But I can’t make that...

English
Possibly, I guess. I've just never seen an indirect object used with the verb "advise" before. Give Bring Leave Sell Tell I guess it could work with "advise," though, since the meaning is close to "tell."!

English
No, there’s no indirect object in that sentence.

computer programming
Run searches for definitions of these at either or both of these websites: http://www.webopedia.com http://www.google.com

English
No one will do your assignment for you, but someone might check what YOU THINK if you post your answers.

Spanish
I don't know Spanish, but I do know that subjects and verbs must "match" -- that is, if you have a first person singular subject, you'd better have the right singular verb form to match it. Study what these terms mean, and then apply them to your sentences. ...

History
https://www.google.com/search?q=aioc+agreement+objectives&oq=aioc+agreement+objectives&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i61.6555j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 Read lots and let us know what you learn.

Research methods
You're welcome.

Research methods
https://www.google.com/search?q=penalties+for+major+and+minor+violations+of+an+IRB-approved+research&oq=penalties+for+major+and+minor+violations+of+an+IRB-approved+research&aqs=chrome..69i57.1804j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8 You'd have to read through several/many of these...

civic education
Greed is the first thing that comes to my mind. What else can you think of?

English
1. Yes, it means one orange. 2. Yes, it's specific. 3. In this use, "the orange peel" seems generic to me. 4. Generic, here. 5. I'm not sure. If there are several straws put together to make a pipe, then I'd have the sentence read "the straws" ...

English
... than he. (Remember that "him" is for objects and "he" is for subjects.) In the second sentence, "still" carries the meaning of "you continue to be" ...

English
All are grammatically correct, but 1 is far better in wording than 2. The adjective "newer" is better for describing buildings (inanimate objects).

English
The verbs in the sentence before #1 still need to be "grew and grew" instead of "blew and blew."

English
Reed is right. Your first sentence should be, “The frog grew and grew.”

English
Yes, the plural forms also produce a generic idea.

Art History
Someone here will be happy to check your answers.

Texas state history
1 is probably right. Check your text to be sure. https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ngc02 2. Probably. Again, check your text. https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fse07

English
You've been studying the Roman Republic and its government, right? Also the Roman Empire? You are basically being asked to write a comparison/contrast paper. Try this: 1. Brainstorm about the Roman Republic on one page. Make a list including everything you know about it ...

English
These instructions seem clear to me. What don't you understand about it?

New Mexico history
https://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1507002406

English
Ms. Sue is hardly a cyber bully! Oh, my! Such little snowflakes!! The point is that Ms. Sue is doing what she needs to in order to keep this website running as its owner intends. Any of you who don’t like it, go find another website to post on. There’s brainly.com, ...

English
Gymnast, get over yourself. If you don't like it here on Jiskha, you can always find other websites to post on.

Cheater Smart Boi banned!
DrBob is absolutely right.

maths,life sciences,physics and geography
In the future, you should conduct searches here: https://www.google.co.za/

maths,life sciences,physics and geography
https://www.google.com/search?q=careers+in+durgan+south+africa&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS705US707&oq=careers+in+durgan+south+africa&aqs=chrome..69i57j0.6100j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

English
Both those nouns seem to be used generically in that sentence.

English
No, 1 and 2 mean the same thing. If you want 1 to mean something close to 3, then you need to add something to 1 that indicates he was elsewhere, but still in sight of the farm. Maybe this ... From a hill across the valley, he saw some horses on the farm.

English
I take it to mean he missed the bus he usually catches. I don't take it in a generic way.

English
2 and 3 have the smoothest phrasing. 1 and 4 are wordy (repetitious).

English
Use 1, not 2. 3 - 6 are all fine. 4 - 6 are more specific than 3, but they're all correct. 7 would be used if you were going to explain that he was swimming in water, not in chocolate (or anything else!).

Health care management
C and D are obviously out. A is probably best, but check your text to see what it says about a situation like B.

Health care management
It could be A or D. What does your text say?

English
1 is fine. 2 - You don't need "the." 3 - It'd be better to say "... in the glass of water." 4 and 5 will be fine without using the word "water." Yes, using "the" indicates a specific glass or unit or body of water.

Math
Yep! Five consecutive posts from the same person without any thinking on her part. =(

English
1 and 2 will work if you're asking about driving another person somewhere. 3, 4, and 5 are fine. Don't substitute "who" (used for subjects) for "whom" (used for objects).

Spanish - repost for anon
https://www.jiskha.com/display.cgi?id=1508350859

English
1 is the very best. 2 is OK, but "Take the poster off the wall" would work better. 3 is totally incorrect, as you said!

English
In this set, #2 refers to a particular coin. All the others refer to coins in general.

connections academy
I'm glad you're using a variety of resources as you've described for your child's science study. That's a good move -- to make sure students learn that information can come from a variety of sources AND that they need to learn the difference between good ...

connections academy
You're welcome. That last sentence is actually a link on that webpage. Parents should not be bamboozled into thinking there are no texts, no matter what form they take.

connections academy
No textbook, whether online or in hand? https://www.connectionsacademy.com/curriculum "Only the Finest Materials Curriculum experts review and select the best texts and teaching materials from leading publishers to create units, lessons, and activities. The Connections ...

connections academy
As long as you post your question or math problem and indicate what YOU THINK about it, what you have done so far, and/or where you're having difficulties, you'll be fine. Those who post whole bunches of questions without answers or a whole list of answers with no ...

Writing - Junior in College
You're welcome. Go get an A!

Writing - Junior in College
Read several of these search results carefully. https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+write+an+interview&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS705US707&oq=how+to+write+an+interview&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.8334j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

English
"The cell phone" seems to refer to a particular phone. If you want to refer to cell phones in general, then use the plural form. 1 - OK 2 - ... on it. 3 - OK (or ... comes in.) 4 - (sentence 3 is better!) 5 - (I'd omit "on the phone" because it's ...

English
Yes.

English
All are fine.

English
All except 2 look fine. An alternate for 1 is this: Tom is a year older than John. An alternate for 5 is this: Tom is a couple of years older than John.

Texas State History
Did you ever figure it out? Read very carefully: https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/ued02

English
7, 8, and 9 are OK. 10 ~~> He had his men sink many Japanese ships ...

English
Sorry! ... do you think?

English
Everything looks good except the word ‘broke’ in 4. Which of these verbs would work best, Doyle think? Sank Destroyed Blew up

English
All make good sense, yes. If I had to choose one, I'd choose 2, but really, all are fine.

Math
No clue what that means. ¯\_(?)_/¯

Math
She won't reply. 12 of these posts in 20 minutes! This type never does. They are mooching for answers, and that's about it. Very sad. =(

Major identity crisis!
Ej/Larry/Hannah/John/Beverly/Lyven/Jon/Jonna/Nana ~ Wow!!! Not only do you seem to have a real identity crisis, you also have no thoughts in your head about any of these math problems. How very sad. =(

English
Read lots. https://www.google.com/search?q=noblewomen+in+the+feudal+system&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS705US707&oq=noblewomen+in+f&aqs=chrome.2.69i57j69i61j0l4.10248j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

English
Figure out WHO is supposed to be doing this collaborating. Make those people the subject of the active sentence. Change the verb and some other words to fit the revised thought. Let us know what you come up with.

English
All are grammatically correct and generally in use, depending on the context. And yes, in 2 it’s referring to a specific apple.

LA
If you’ve read the book, you’ll know which of the choices is not true.

English
All are fine, but 2 and 4 seem smoother to me.

English
Kat is right. Both forms of the comparative are fine.

US Government 11th
There's a better choice.

English
The word "guy" is a bit more casual than "man." They mean about the same thing -- although I guess "guy" could sometimes mean a teenage boy, not a grown man!

English
I'd use 3, not 1. 4 and 5 have different meanings from the others.

English
3, 4, and 5 are fine. 1 and 2 are not incorrect, but the word "got" really isn't needed. Forms of the verb "to have" do the job just fine!

English
1-3 are fine, but 4 and 5 aren't. Yes, #1 comes from #6.

English
1 - 6 are all fine. 7 and 8 would be fine if you use "fewer" instead of "less" -- "book" is a count-noun, so "less" is incorrect. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/noncount.htm

Language
Nothing. I've never read it. Have you read it?

English
1, 2, 3, and 4 are commonly used, and maybe 6. 5 is not used. It's too repetitive.

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