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Social Studies

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I am the Star Reporter who is going to visit George Washington at his home at Mount Vernon during the years of 1759-1774. I am interviewing him about his political and personal views, activities, goals, and predictions. Develop 10 questions to ask President Washington. Then tell why you ask these questions.

1. What do you predict will happen if America doesn't avoid foreign influence?

Answer: I predict that foreign propaganda will operate inside and outside the government. We better be careful or that "foreign influence" in our government will trick Americans about whom they can trust.

2. What thoughts were going through your head as you were crossing the Delaware River?

Answer: Well, when I fell in I definitely thought that I wasn't going to make it.

3. Can you tell me about your time at Valley Forge?

Answer: Again, it was very rough. The freezing temperatures for my Continental Army was tough. Some soldiers had no shoes, there was little to eat, and many soldiers felt they couldn't go on. It was definitely a trying time.

4. Can you tell me of a personal ambition you may have?

Answer: One of my personal ambitions is to secure a commission in the British Army.

5. Have you ever had a time that you were completely outraged about something?

Answer: Yes, I was outraged that as a colonel in the Virginia militia, I could be ordered around by any officer
in the British Army. I mean the army's refusal to take American soldiers serious personally offends me.

6. What are your reasons for supporting the countries fight for independence.

Answer: There are a few reasons. Some being personal, political, and economic. My economic reason deals with my role as a planter. I am constantly owing money to the London-based merchant who buy my tobacco and sell me goods. The British laws put tobacco producers at a disadvantage and leaves me continually short of cash. I feel this system is unfair and needs to be stopped. My political reason for supporting independence relates to my personal and economic reasons. I feel America is developing its own identity, one that revolves around ideas of liberty, equality, and unity. The British tends to ignore, even insult, this identity, using American colonies largely as a way to make their money. I believe America as a whole will never achieve its goals until we are independent of Britain.

7.What are your views on federal government?

Answer: I believe that federal government needs to remain strong enough to prevent state or regional interests from gaining too much power.

8. Why do you dislike being affiliated with a specific party?

Answer: I feel it always serves to distract the public councils and reduce the strength of the public councils and public administration. It just stirs up the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms. It creates hostility and resentment of one part against another, which creates rebellion, even riots at times. I feel it opens the door to foreign influences and corruption, which finds a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. This just makes the policy and will of one country subjected to the policy and will of another.

9. What are your views on slavery?

Answer: I wanted slaves who enlisted in the Continental Army
not be repossessed by their owners. I have provided that the slaves I own be emancipated upon my death. I have also provided that they be given a proper education so that they can be self-supporting as freed men and women. My opposition to slavery deals more with the immorality of one man holding ownership over another.

10. On a lighter side, what are some activities you enjoy when not on the battle field?

Answer: I enjoy fox hunting, and fishing. I have a major distiller of whiskey that I enjoy overseeing, and I like to breed donkeys. I feel they are a better breed for farm work than horses are.

The reason I ask all these questions is so I can give the citizens a good sense of who the real George Washington is before he becomes the President of the United States.

  • Social Studies -

    1. Did Washington warn of foreign influence before 1775? Didn't he welcome French and Polish help during our upcoming revolution?

    2. His famous crossing of the Delaware was in 1776.

    3. When did he camp at Valley Forge?

    You are not off to a good start. Check the rest of your questions to make sure you're asking about events that happened before 1775.

  • Social Studies -

    I have worked on this assignment for days and I am just lost! Can't tell you how much I have researched it!

  • Social Studies -

    I'm sure you put a lot of time and effort into this assignment. However, a lot of your effort was wasted because you didn't follow the instructions of conducting this interview in or before 1774. It's important that you keep these dates in mind. Independence wasn't declared until 1776. At the time you're interviewing Washington, the Revolution hadn't begun.

    This is a good lesson of the importance of understanding and following directions.

  • Social Studies -

    1. What did you enjoy as a kid?

    Answer: I liked to hunt, study the art of war, and even shoot a firearm at times. Believe it or not when I was 14 I tried to sign on to a British war ship to be a powder monkey, but my mom wouldn't allow me to be part of it.

    2. Can you tell me about leading the force to challenge the French control of the Ohio River Valley?

    Answer: We were defeated at Fort Necessity in Pennsylvanian. This triggered the French and Indian War.

    3. Tell me about your time as a colonel working alongside General Edward Braddock.

    Answer: I barely escaped death when we went to battle with the French at the Battle of the Monongahela in Pennsylvania.
    We were defeated, but I was able to regain my colonelcy and command of the Virginian militia forces.

    4. What are your views on the Whig position?

    Answer: I am strongly sympathetic to the Whig position.

    5. Have you ever had a time that you were completely outraged about something?

    Answer: Yes, I was outraged that as a colonel in the Virginia militia, I could be ordered around by any officer
    in the British Army.

    6. What are your reasons for supporting the countries fight for independence.

    Answer: There are a few reasons. Some being personal, political, and economic. My economic reason deals with my role as a planter. I am constantly owing money to the London-based merchant who buy my tobacco and sell me goods. The British laws put tobacco producers at a disadvantage and leaves me continually short of cash. I feel this system is unfair and needs to be stopped. My political reason for supporting independence relates to my personal and economic reasons. I feel America is developing its own identity, one that revolves around ideas of liberty, equality, and unity. The British tends to ignore, even insult, this identity, using American colonies largely as a way to make their money. I believe America as a whole will never achieve its goals until we are independent of Britain.

    7.What are your views on federal government?

    Answer: I believe that federal government needs to remain strong enough to prevent state or regional interests from gaining too much power.

    8. Why do you dislike being affiliated with a specific party?

    Answer: I feel it always serves to distract the public councils and reduce the strength of the public councils and public administration. It just stirs up the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms. It creates hostility and resentment of one part against another, which creates rebellion, even riots at times. I feel it opens the door to foreign influences and corruption, which finds a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. This just makes the policy and will of one country subjected to the policy and will of another.

    9. What are your views on slavery?

    Answer: I wanted slaves who enlisted in the Continental Army
    not be repossessed by their owners. I have provided that the slaves I own be emancipated upon my death. I have also provided that they be given a proper education so that they can be self-supporting as freed men and women. My opposition to slavery deals more with the immorality of one man holding ownership over another.

    10. On a lighter side, what are some activities you enjoy when not on the battle field?

    Answer: I enjoy fox hunting, and fishing. I have a major distiller of whiskey that I enjoy overseeing, and I like to breed donkeys. I feel they are a better breed for farm work than horses are.

    The reason I ask all these questions is so I can give the citizens a good sense of who the real George Washington is before he becomes the President of the United States.

  • Social Studies -

    Great!

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