Physics

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Surprisingly, very few athletes can jump more than 2.7 ft (0.82 m) straight up. Use d = 1/2 gt2 and solve for the time one spends moving upward in a 0.82 m vertical jump. Then double it for the "hang-time" -- the time one's feet are off the ground.
Can you explain step by step please.

  • Physics -

    Use: d = (1/2) gt^2
    Where: g = -9.8[m/s^2]
    Given: d = 0.82[m]
    Find: t

    Just rearrange the equation and substitute for the given values.

  • Physics -

    d=(1/2)gt^2
    g=-9.8m/s^2
    d=0.82
    what about 2.7 ft?

  • Physics -

    27

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