physics

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Calculate a person's hang time if he moves horizontally 2 m during a 1.39 m high-jump.

  • physics -

    To go up and down H = 1.39 meters requires
    2*sqrt(2H/g)= 1.07 seconds
    regardless of how far the jumper moves horizontally. They provided the 2 meter distance to trick you.

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