Math

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Use the Intermediate Value Theorem to show that there is a root of the given equation in the specified interval. x^4+x-3=0, interval (1,2).

According the to theorem, I found that a is 1, b is 2 and N is 0. f(1)= 2 and f(2) = 17. Is the root (1.16,0)?

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