literature

posted by .

. Which of these sentences uses grammar correctly? (Points : 1)
Whom may I say is calling?
Who may I say is calling?
Whose calling?

  • literature -

    Who may I say is calling?

    The pronoun, "who," is the subject of "is calling."

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

  1. astronomy

    I want to know what is the controversy of PLuto's status as a planet There is not much controversy. Pluto is small, and smaller than some of the orbiting asteroids. Some scientists want to stop calling Pluto a planet because of this. …
  2. English

    1. Can I say who is calling please? 2. Who's calling please?
  3. English

    1. Thank you for calling. 2. Thank you for your calling. 3. Thank you for your call. 4. Thank you for call. 5. Thank you for calling me. 6. Thank you for your phone call. 7. Thank you for making a phone call. 8. Thank you for making …
  4. English

    1. I don't know who to say. 2. I don't know who to say to. 3. I don't know whom to say. 4. I don't know whom to say to. 5. I don't know who to say about. 6. I don't know whm to say about. 7. I don't know to whom to say. (Which ones …
  5. grammar

    Which of these sentences is punctuated correctly?
  6. math

    a basic cellular phone plan costs $18 per month for 50 calling minutes. Additional time costs $0.30 per minute. The formula C = 18+0.30 (x-50) gives the monthly cost for this plan for calling minutes, where x > 50. How many calling …
  7. algebra

    basic cellphone plan cost $20 per month for 60 calling minutes. Additional time costs .40 per minute. The formula gives the monthly cost for this plan C, for x calling minutes, where x > 60. How many calling minutes are possible …
  8. algebra

    basic cellphone plan cost $20 per month for 60 calling minutes. Additional time costs .40 per minute. The formula gives the monthly cost for this plan C, for x calling minutes, where x > 60. How many calling minutes are possible …
  9. English

    1. Don't call me names. 2. He is calling me a name. 3. She is calling him names. ------------------------------ Are they all grammatical?
  10. English

    1. I am calling instead of Mr. Frank. 2. I am calling in place of Mr. Frank. 3. I'm calling on behalf of Mr. Frank. 4. I'm calling in lieu of Mr. Frank. ----------------------------------- Are they all the same in meaning?

More Similar Questions