Post a New Question

Calculus please help!!! double integral

posted by .

Combine the following two integrals into one by sketching the region, then switching the order of integration. (sketch the region)
im gonna use the S for integral sign..because idk what else to use.

SS6ycos(x^3-3x)dxdy+SS6ycos(x^3-3x)

And the first integration limits for x are between -1 and y, for y the limits are between 0 and -1.
And the second part of the problem the limits for x are -1 to 0 and for y 0 to -1

  • Calculus - for Sean/Mary -

    I don't quite understand what is wanted. The first integral has us integrating x from a number to a function of y. The 2nd is over a fixed region. Both integrands are the same.

    The real kicker is trying to integrate cos(x^3-3x). Forget it. Can't even do it numerically, since the upper limit is a function of y. I must be missing something here.

Respond to this Question

First Name
School Subject
Your Answer

Similar Questions

  1. maths

    use an iterated integral to find area of region bounded by graphs sin(x) and cos(x) between x=pi/4 and x=5*pi/4 but using HORIZONTAL strips.(i.e dxdy is order of integration for the double integral). it has been suggested by a textbook …
  2. double integral

    1. Sketch the region of integration & reverse the order of integration. Double integral y dydz... 1st (top=1, bottom =0)... 2nd(inner) integral (top=cos(piex), bottom=(x-2)... 2. Evaluate the integral by reversing the order of integration. …
  3. Calculus

    I'm having trouble reversing the order of integration of ∫∫dxdy from a=0 to b=2(3)^(1/2) for x and c=y^(2/6) to d=(16-y^2)^(1/2) for y. I graphed the region of integration and that still doesn't really help me. i got approximately …
  4. double integrals

    Combine the following two integrals into one by sketching the region, then switching the order of integration. (sketch the region) im gonna use the S for integral sign..lol SS6ycos(x^3-3x)dxdy+SS6ycos(x^3-3x) And the first integration …
  5. MATH

    (a) Transform the expression (x − a)^2 + y^2 = a^2 into polar coordinates. (b) Sketch the region R bounded by the curve given in part (a). (c) Use a double integral in polar coordinates to find the area of the region R.
  6. Calc 2

    a. Integral (x^2)/(sqrt(1+(x^2))) Would I separate these two into 2 separate integrals?
  7. calc 3

    1. Evaluate the given integral by making an appropriate change of variables, where R is the region in the first quadrant bounded by the ellipse 36x^2+25y^2=1. L= double integral R (4sin(144x^2+100y^2) dA. 2. Use the given transformation …
  8. calculus (please with steps and explanations)

    consider the function f that is continuous on the interval [-5,5] and for which the definite integral 0(bottom of integral sign) to 5(top of integral sign) of f(x)dx=4. Use the properties of the definite integral to evaluate each integral: …
  9. Calculus (double integral) PLEASE HELP!

    Evaluate double integral ln((x-y)/(x+y)) dy dx where the double integral region is the triangle with vertices (1,0),(4,3), (4,1). Hint: use a transformation with the Jacobian.
  10. Calculus - Integrals

    Consider the region enclosed by the graphs of x=y^2-5 and x=3-y^2 a)Express the area of this region by setting up an integral with respect to x b) Express the area of this region by setting up an integral with respect to y c) Find …

More Similar Questions

Post a New Question