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American Literature

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We read the poem "Verses Upon The Burning Of Our House" By Anne Bradstreet. I need to find text in the poem that either shows that she really did miss all her possessions like her books and unpublished poems, or that material items really did not matter to her.
I've read the poem a few times and I am convinced that she did miss a few things lost in the fire, such as her chest. Am I correct and is there anything else that she misses?

  • American Literature -

    What do you think about these lines?

    The flame consume my dwelling place.
    And when I could no longer look,
    I blest his grace that gave and took,
    That laid my goods now in the dust.

    ...

    Adieu, Adieu, All's Vanity.
    Then straight I 'gin my heart to chide:
    And did thy wealth on earth abide,
    Didst fix thy hope on mouldring dust,

    ...

  • American Literature -

    Well if I'm correct, then it seems like she bid farewell to her belongings and moved on?

  • American Literature -

    Exactly. And she "blest his grace" (thanked God) that her things lay "in the dust" but she is alive.

  • American Literature -

    Oh, is that the only section of the poem that shows that she does not miss any of her possessions?

  • American Literature -

    I see two sections above. Don't you?

  • American Literature -

    Yes. Thank you very much.

  • American Literature -

    You're welcome.

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